Dandelion Wine

This year the exploration with Dandelions went beyond jelly and dried leaves and roots into fermenting a wine.  What a wonderful experiment it turned out to be.  I explored two ways of processing these flowers.  One with yeast added and one left to ferment naturally.  Pictured is the natural ferment which pulls in yeast from the environment.  This batch was put to ferment on April 18th, 2020 and it was left to sit until June 10th, 2020.  Almost a full two months.

Upon straining the liquid from the brew the smell of wine alcohol was evident.  I was surprised by the inner excitement and amazement I felt.  Since leaving the food and beverage industry wine hadn’t been a big part of life once having kids that was followed by pursuing focused awareness on somatic learning and connections.  Now in this adventure I couldn’t wait to try a glass.  It turned out to be a very good glass of wine.  A week before filtering it I had a sample and it was still too sweet for my liking.  Someone who likes sweet wine could decant it sooner than I did.

After filtering it and putting it into bottles for another few days before pouring a glass I was met with a pop upon opening the bottle.  It was as strong as opening a corked champagne bottle.  This means it was still in a fermenting process. I wouldn’t want to leave these bottles capped much longer without letting some air in!

After working late in the garden and sitting down at my desk with this glass was a treat.  Adding to the experience was the connection to picking the dandelion flowers myself, processing them, and then adding them into a mixture for a  fermenting process.  Very satisfying.

The second experiment with added yeast is not ready to be filtered and bottled yet.  I will compare the two once it is.  Until then I will continue to find pleasure at the memory of pleasure from success with a new recipe adventure.

For me a difference between this wine and commercial wine is the aliveness of it.  It seems to activate my mouth in away that enlivens it as the liquid first makes contact.  I am curious if the added yeast dandelion wine will give the same reaction.

For more on the recipe for Dandelion Wine……….


Read more:

Wild Winemaking: Easy & Adventurous Recipes Going Beyond Grapes, Including Apple Champagne, Ginger–Green Tea Sake, Key Lime–Cayenne Wine, and 142 More by Richard W. Bender 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Naturally Fermented Dandelion Wine Recipe

All the lovely scientific information you may wish to read is available to research on line.  This is the basic and simple recipe I used that created enjoyable results for me.

Equipment

  • Bean Crock Pot
  • Strainer
  • Measuring Cup
  • Kitchen Pot
  • Cheese Cloth or Cotton
  • Balloons
  • Bottles & toppers

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Dandelion Flower Heads
  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 8 cups Water
  • 1 Orange ( 1 tablespoon Zest, 1/4 cup juice & slices)
  • Lemon (1 tablespoon Zest)
  • Lime (1 tablespoon juice)
  • Handful Raisins
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ginger, dried or fresh
  • Cloves

 #1 – Freshly Picked Flower Head Preparation

After picking the flower heads they must be washed and then pick off as much of the green base as possible.  This is an important step as the green base of the flower petals creates a strong bitter flavour that overpowers the petals.  Once the flower petals are ready add them to crock pot with water and let steep for 24 hours.

I rinse Dandelion Flower Heads in my homemade Apple Cider Vinegar Bath followed by a freshwater bath

#2 – Prep with the ingredients

After the flower petals have rested in water for two days, place them in a clean pot bringing water back up to 4 quarts adding sugar, citrus zests, orange & lime juices, raisins cloves and ginger.  Bring this mixture to a soft boil for up to an hour.

#3 – Crock Pot to Ferment 

(I leave flower petals in ferment however one can filter them out before adding mixture to crock pot)

After cooking to infuse the mixture for an hour pour back into the crock pot and cover with orange slices.  Cover the crock pot with cotton and put pot aside in cool dark space to rest and infuse.

#4 – Fermenting complete

Once the fermenting process is complete (stops bubbling) this brew can be filtered through cheesecloth or strainer and poured into bottles.  These bottle can be put away for 6 months to age before drinking them.

If one is uncertain about the fermentation process being complete a balloon can be placed over the bottle to observe if it expands.  If it expands it is still fermenting.  Leave ballon on until fermentation stops before corking.

#5 – Enjoy or give as gifts

Once the bottle has rested enjoy or gift away as gifts during the holiday season.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)

 

Also known as:  Saint Roberts, Red Robin, Storksbill, Dragons Blood, Blood Wort, Cranesbill Herb

Uses: Adaptogen, antibiotic, antiviral, antioxidant, astringent, antitumour, diuretic to lower blood sugar, blood cleanser, diarrhea, digestive, dysentery, eyewash for inflamed eyes, gargle, gout, immune booster, increase energy and oxygen at cellular level, jaundice, poultice for lactating breast hardness, bruising and rheumatism pain, skin wash for ulcers and herpes sores, sedative, styptic for nosebleeds and wounds, clean up toxic metals and radiation in the environment.

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves, Stems & Roots

Preparation: Culinary, Flower Essence, Remedy, Repellent,Tea, Tincture, tonic

 


  • Symbolizes:   listening to intuition, weaving heart & mind together
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Steadfastness
  • Associated with: Sacral Chakra,  Throat Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus
  • Mineral Companions:  Blue Lace Agate & Clear Quartz

Dr. Otto Warburg, winner of Nobel Prize has stated:

“The prime cause of cancer is lack of oxygenation of the cells.” 

Germanium is a master oxygenator which means it has the ability to increase the oxygen flow into the human cells.  Increasing available oxygen to the cells increases the immune systems ability to fight off free radicals and illness.   Dr Warburg discovered that cancer cells could only exist in an anaerobic state created by a lack of oxygen which reduces the cells ability to regenerate.  An anaerobic state of the cells is the start of experiencing pain, disease, wayward cells and cancer.

Germanium also stimulates electrical impulses at a cellular level which is an additional benefit of consuming it in our eating plan.   Its remarkable effects have been documented in medical journals where it has been described as an energy and immune builder, preventative, and an adaptogen for alleviating minor or major health imbalances.

Herb Roberts contains volatile oil, tannin, Vitamins; A, B. and C, and calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus.  ellagic acid and geraniin compounds, and germanium.

This plant will be one of the first plants to grow in areas containing chemical waste like areas along railway ties that leave deposits of heavy metals in the soil or under electrical lines that leave radiation in the soil.


This herb was introduced by a new neighbour who left it growing in flower pots along the side of their house that  faced ours.  As luck would have it when its flowers turned into seed pods and dried, they exploded spraying seeds everywhere.   These past two years Herb Roberts has been readily available to munch on, infuse into tea, create oils and tinctures and then dry.

This year due to COVID 19, I have begun creating a daily infusion to drink during the day to increase my immune system and metabolism.  

When adding garden plant parts to infuse in water under the sun during the day, what I notice the most when drinking it is that it’s softer and somehow I am left feeling an increase in hydration.  More so than when drinking tap water.  Others things I notice is the flavour and aliveness of the water, which is 100 times greater than bottled water.

Once drinking freshly infused water with garden plants I can easily differentiate between the hard dead bottled water and the soft aliveness of freshly infused water.  There is immediate physical relief and sense of wet hydration that is missing when compared to the hard water that can actually choke on the way down.   Now with the addition of Herb Roberts plant parts this sense of hydration is even higher.

Shortly after the birth of my second child I had my own cancer scare.

Just prior to my children’s birth my interest had been focused on herbology and then while having babies I studied homeopathic remedies to assist during their development and health stages.   Having been exposed to these philosophies I decided to have a dialogue with my Doctor about pursuing alternative health care for a time before going into the acute care of Western medicine.   During this pursuit I was lucky enough to tap into the expanding consciousness of that time.  A focus on structured water was just emerging.  What I learned was that water only entered into our cells to clean them of debris and hydrate them if the water had the same structure as when flowing over minerals and debris in the running waters of the stream and rivers.   Having that experience now when introducing infused waters with plant parts I can easily recognize  the similarities.  Cheaper?,  yes!  Convenient?, yes!

What truly gets me excited about infusing Herb Roberts with water is from experiencing this:

Another learning experience during my cancer scare was quite accidental.   This incident introduced the importance of the body’s electrical field to me. I couldn’t access a particular supplement locally so I had to order it.  When I moved towards it as it arrived I felt an electric field around my body engage.  I was shocked and looked around to see the source of the electricity.  Then when I picked up the box my hand chakra came alive.  My whole mood shifted and I remember a smile of pleasure come over me.  Wanting to have more clarity I began to research this phenomena.  I learned about the body and cell electrical field.  What I discovered is that the cell can only absorb what it electrically aligns with.   Hydration is important for the cell to flush and hydrate however it can only do this with water that is electrically designed so it can enter the cell.  If it’s not in alignment the cell doesn’t let the water in.  Knowing this has created an excitement around this little wild herb.

Buy Canadian Herb Roberts Seeds 

If you cannot grow and pick your own purchase dried Herb Roberts 

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The Detox Miracle Sourcebook: Raw Foods and Herbs for Complete Cellular Regeneration – by Author: Robert S. Morse N.D. 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum biflorum)

EdibleMortartea kettle

Solomons Seal

Also known as:  Dropberry,  Lady’s Seals,  Sealroot, Sealwort,  Solomon Seal, St. Mary’s Seal

Uses: Anti-inflammatory, Blood Pressure, Boils & Rashes, Bone Injuries, Bruises, Culinary, Digestive, Expectorant,  Insect Bites, Medicinal, Muscular-Skeletal support, Pain Relief, Piles, Tumours

Parts used:  Flowers, roots/rhizomes & new shoots *Berries are poisonous

Preparation: creams, Flower Essences, Herbal Tea, New shoots boiled like Asparagus, Poultice, Salve, Sleep Aid, Spray, Tincture, Topical Skin & Cosmetic Products


  • Symbolizes:  Protection
  • Associated with:  Brow Chakra
  • Element:  Earth
  • Governed by:  Saturn

 


Considered one of the top 10 healing plants in Asia
& of great value by early North Americans & Europeans

As a cosmetic Culpepper says:

‘the diluted water of the whole plant used to the face or other parts of the skin, cleanses it from freckles, spots or any marks whatever, leaving the place fresh, fair and lovely, for which purpose it is much used by the Italian ladies and is the principal ingredient of most of the cosmetics and beauty washes advertised by perfumers at high price.’

 

Solomon’s Seal Roots are used in treating a variety of ailments.  Some ways they have been used are:

  • blood cleanser
  • blood pressure
  • restoring damaged cartilage and connecting tissue.
  • easing inflammation, bruising, wounds and skin irritations.
  • healing bone injuries (broken, stressed) and associated connective tissues
  • increasing synovial fluid to reduce grinding in joints.
  • toning tendons, ligaments, joints and attachments associated with repetitive stress, injury and inflammation.
  • upset stomach
  • loosening mucous in lungs
  • pain relief
  • reproductive health
  • sleeping aid

Bones, Ligaments, Muscles, Soft Tissue, Synovial fluid

Solomon Seal can support healing of acute trauma to the body’s muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, joints and cartilage. It encourages tightening or loosening of muscles, ligaments, and tendons as needed; helping damaged tissues return to their original states; creating a balance that can correct old injuries and help prevent new ones; and helping the body produce more or better quality synovial fluid so that joints have less friction. It has been used to support recovery from surgery.

Brain

Solomon’s Seal can support increased mental clarity, concentration, and sleep.

Heart & Blood

Solomon’s Seal has been used to lower blood pressure and clean blood.  It also lowers blood sugar.

Pain

Solomon’s Seal supports relief from pain.

Respiratory

Solomon’s Seal helps to clear congestion and loosen mucous in the lungs and soothe throat irritation.

Skin

Solomon’s Seal can be used as a poultice on boils, skin irritations and bruising.

Buy Canadian  Dried Roots – Bulk

Buy Canadian Spring Plants

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

#food economy: fresh from the backyard

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Pictured here is home-made sauerkraut and dressing on edible weeds and flowers with sausage.  Expense:  Sausages, cabbage and dressing ingredients over meals.

Imagine taking over your own yard upkeep and developing a relationships with what nature grows.  It is not only an interesting learning experience, it’s rewarding and healthy too!  One of the biggest gifts experienced immediately is the taste.  The greens have a much more substantial flavour than anything one can get from the grocer.  Instead of eating large amounts of dressing to make up for lack of taste in the greens, a variety of different greens fresh from the backyard provide a variety of flavours.

Besides saving money the benefits are: saving time, no storage needed, and for me the biggest bonus is the nutrient content.  When it grows in the backyard it’s on natures time.  The time from being picked and eaten is minutes which means no lose of nutrition through travel of handling.  No one else has touched it!

Ingredients in this salad:

Leaves:

  • Dandelion – promotes bile secretion and supports the liver
  • Yellow Dock
  • Herb Robert – has anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory and immunogenic properties as well as a good source of nutrients
  • Mint
  • While Onion/chives
  • Plantain – leaves have astringent, diuretic and expectorant properties
  • Oxalis – lemon flavour
  • Oregano
  • Wild Violets – loaded with minerals and vitamins, especially A and C
  • Purple Dead Nettle – considered to be anti-inflammatory, diuretic, diaphoretic, astringent and styptic
  • Winter Kale
  • Clover – young leaves picked before the flowers appear can be used raw in salads
  • Ladies Mantle – it’s tannin content makes it beneficial in healing stomach ulcers, diarrhea and irritations of the throat.

 

Edible Weeds

Flowers:

  • Forget-me-nots – lower is rich in Vitamin C and Anti-oxidants
  • Oxalis
  • English Daisy – long history as a calmative for inflamed skin and for stomach and intestinal problems
  • Rosemary
  • Calendula – shown to have antispasmotic, lymphatic, cholagogue and emmenagogue actions

Edible Flowers

Non-Edible Flowers


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

s @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibletea kettle

Also known as: Punk Tree; Broadleaved Paperbark, Weeping paperbark, Broadleaf Tea Tree

Uses:  Culinary, Detergents, Medicinal, Perfume, Repellent, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Twigs

Preparation:  Tinctures, Tonic, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Toothpaste

Melaleuca leucadendra Linn., Plate 15 from “Forest Flora of New South Wales” by w:Joseph Henry Maiden (1859–1925) – wikimedia commons

  • Symbolizes: Unity & Strength
  • Element:  Ether & Space
  • Governed by:  Venus, 5th Chakra

The origin of the name Cajeput means “the sunny side of the mountain.”  It is related to tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia, with a similar but stronger camphorous aroma. It is used in Tiger Balm and in the decongestant Olbas Oil.

Properties:

  • general antiseptic
  • anti-infective
  • antiputrefactive
  • decongestioning
  • anticatarrhal
  • expectorant
  • neuralgic
  • antispasmodic agent

Culinary

Fruits and leaves of Cajeput can be used for infusing into a tea.  Oils from this tree can be used for flavouring baked goods, candies, and relishes.

Health & Wellness

Cajeput promotes circulation, reduces fevers and relieves cramps. Its herbal uses for internal use are to treat bronchitis, colds, gastric infections, headaches, roundworms, sinusitis, toothache, tuberculosis,and tumors; to loosen phlegm and as a tonic. Externally an oil of Cajeput can be applied to the skin for rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, acne, nasal congestion, sinusitis, toothache, chilblains, mites (scabies) and a fungal infection of the skin (tinea versicolor).  It is used in commercial preparations for bacterial and fungal infections in fish.

Buy Cajeput Seeds – Product # S1593


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Betony (Stachys officinalis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

MortarDyetea kettle

Betony

Also known as: common hedgenettle, betony, purple betony, wood betony, bishopwort, or bishop’s wort

Uses:  Dye, Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Poultice, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Tea, Tinctures, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Infused Water

 

 


  • Symbolizes: Protection, Purification, Love
  • Language of Flowers:  Surprise, Healing
  • Associated with: Jupiter
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus, 3rd Chakra

Properties

Betony is anthelmintic, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, mildly cathartic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, mildly emetic, emmenagogue, expectorant, nervine, sedative, sternutatory, tonic and vulnerary.


Culinary

The leaves can be brewed into a caffeine-free substitute for black tea similar in flavour and colour.

Health and Wellness

Betony works directly on the nervous system and is a remedy for headaches and nervous tension and in combination with its muscle relaxing properties it makes an effective remedy for sleep issues.  Betony can be taken for anxiety, headaches, pre-menstrual complaints, poor memory and tension.   It’s astringent properties makes it an effective mouth wash and topical for wounds.

Dye Plant

Picked fresh, all parts of the plants are used to make dye.  Used with Alum it produces chartreuse.

Buy Betony Seeds ←

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

Gift of Leaves & Flower Tea Blends from France

Tisanes from Faou, France

Recently I found tea blend packages anonymously left in my mailbox from a French commune.  Trying these blends I noticed the freshness of the flowers and leaves with rich, smooth and deep flavours.  Getting to know the ingredients I recognized I had many of the plants growing in my own garden.  I am excited to learn about these new blends and how I can use the resources from my own backyard!

Herbal Tea Blends from Faou, France

Morning Tea Blend

  • Black Current
  • Elderberry
  • Thyme
  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Yarrow
  • Cornflower
  • Calendula

Relaxation Tea Blend 

  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Nettles
  • Marjoram
  • Hawthorn
  • Angelique
  • Mallow – Malva

Sweet Night Tea Blend

  • Hawthorn
  • Lemon Balm
  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Marjoram
  • Oregon

 

Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Yellow Bedstraw (Galium verum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibleDyetea kettle

Our Lady’s Bedstraw

Also known as: Catchstraw, Cheese Rennet,  Lady’s Bedstraw, Maid’s Hair, Our Lady’s Bedstraw, Petty Mugget, Yellow Bedstraw, Yellow Cleavers

Uses:  Culinary, Dye, Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Poultice, Topical Skin Products

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Tea, Tinctures, Vinegar,Oil, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Infused Water

Photo credit:  https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lady%27s_bedstraw_(Galium_verum),_Heartwood_Forest_(28529823823).jpg

  • Symbolizes:  Love, Rejoicing, Rudeness
  • Associated with: New hope, ideas and grace. Freedom from the past, vulnerability, and release of grief and sorrow.
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus

Yellow Bed-straw was once used to stuff mattress. It has been written that Mary stuffed the bed for Baby Jesus with Yellow Bed-straw.  It has a fresh fragrance of vanilla and cut grass.

Culinary

  • The seeds are edible and can be roasted and ground into a caffeine-free, coffee substitute.
  • The young shoots can be boiled for ten to fifteen minutes as a veggie topped with butter or  added to a salad.
  • The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked.
  • The leaves and stems can be used as a curdling agent in cheese making.
  • The flowers infused in water creates a refreshing beverage.

Health and Wellness

Lady’s Bed-straw has been used for treating cancer, epilepsy, hysteria, spasms, tumors, loss of appetite, gravel, stone or urinary disorders, and chest and lung ailments. It is also used to increase urine output (as a diuretic) for relieving water retention, especially swollen ankles. It soothes reddened skin, reduces inflammation making it useful in  a poultice for cuts, skin infections, slow-healing wounds etc.

Well known Herbalist Culpepper suggested the juice from this plant for earaches.

The leaves, stems and flowering shoots are antispasmodic, astringent, diuretic, and high in C making them good for spring tonic and scurvy.  As a wash or lotion, it is said to fade freckles and sunburn and great for psoriasis.

Dye Plant

A yellow dye is made from the flowering stems and used as food colouring and hair dye, and red dyes are extracted from its roots. A yellow dye is obtained from the flowering tops.

Buy Lady Bedstraw Seeds  

 

Recent research by Schmidt et al (2014) has supported Galium verums traditional use as an anticancer remedy, as it demonstrated DNA protection against benzapyrene, a toxic compound in cigarette smoke.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Excited about Black Garlic

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

I had never heard of black garlic until receiving a black garlic fermenter as a gift.  Researching more about it and how to use it I was excited to learn about it benefits for the brain and aging.  Apparently besides protecting the heart and preventing cancer, black garlic may also help  maintain memory. Its antioxidants can reduce inflammation in the brain and help block cognitive conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.   As a Feldenkrais®  Practitioner and someone who is aging this is great knowledge.

What is Black Garlic?  (Not to be mistaken for black garlic oil)

Garlic cloves turn black through an aging process using heat.  It was  first introduced through Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks.  With a fermenter the cloves are contained at a set temperature and humidity for 9 to 14 days.  Once taken out of the chamber they are set aside to dry and rest for a number of weeks.

The results

The black cloves are soft and gummy with a sweetness replacing the abrupt hit to the taste-buds from a raw clove.  These cloves can be used in recipes for flavouring to sauces, eaten individually or spreadable for sandwiches and used as a pizza topping.  These coves do not leave an uncomfortable garlic smell like raw cloves do.

The experience of making black garlic

Naively I set the fermenter up in the kitchen for the first batch and discovered how overpowering the smell was after a few days.  This possibly attributed to none of us getting any viruses this winter!  The second batch I set it up in a sheltered placement outside.  The one mistake I made with the first batch was to cut off the tops of the cloves.  This dried out the cloves and left them hard and too dry.  Now I leave the cloves and outer casing intact fermenting them whole.  They come out of the fermenter soft and gummy like.

Even tho the first batch was dry and hard I began munching on them to learn more about the experience.  What I noticed is that the taste changes as the cloves age.  They become sweeter and more delicate in flavour.   It was instantly recognizable how these could enhance any recipe.

I discovered how easy it is to ferment garlic cloves with a fermenter.

The experience of eating black garlic

In my research I learned that for health benefits one could eat three to four cloves a day.  I set an intention to begin to do just this while checking in with myself to notice any differences.  As a Feldenkrais® Practitioner I am interested in the relationship between good food and function.   I have experienced increased gut health eating fermented foods that directly impact brain function so I was curious and excited to find out more about any changes I would feel eating black garlic.  One of the most notable differences was calming down my fear center of the brain.  I can only describe it as food empathy!  I had experienced this once before after seeing Doctor Abraham Hoffer in the mid nineties.

Background on noticing change in brain fear center

Doctor Hoffer was researching and designing water filters for living water that I wanted to investigate.  I was on a deep detox after having a serious medical diagnosis and was learning about living water.  Doctor Hoffer was the author of many books, one in particular was the Niacin Effect.  Doctor Hoffer suggested that I take high does of  vitamins to supplement my diet. His focus was on the lack of nutrition in foods available today that was no longer feeding the brain the nutrition it needed.   Following his instructions I noticed my responses calmed down while driving.  I was normally nervous to merge in high traffic areas and within a couple of weeks I recognized I had not been having any nervous reactions at all in these circumstances.  After eating black garlic for a few days I noticed that this happened again while being a passenger in a car with my son.  I hate to admit that I had been nervous riding with him.  He is a good driver however his stops and starts have been too fast for my nervous system.  This seems to be in the past now after eating black garlic.  Now, I have no reactions to it!

I coach students to expand beyond their set patterns physically, mentally and emotionally and recognize how adding black garlic could support them to begin to take action naturally with no hesitation.  In myself I recognize it as a source of nutrition for the brain center that can block one from fear and anxiety.

I have learned that black garlic can be expensive to buy already processed.  The mesh bag of cloves above was $5.00 at a local market.  The only added expense will be the electricity.  I do not use a dishwasher, or microwave or electric pans so I this is a minor philosophical  challenge. However, worth it.

I give black garlic and this fermenter my personal recommendation.

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Another book by Doctor Hoffer:

  • Feel Better, Live Longer With Vitamin B-3: Nutrient Deficiency and Dependency

    • Presents an unified theory of nutrient deficiency and dependency. The authors prove that large, controlled doses of vitamin B-3 or niacin, are effective in preventing, treating, and even reversing such niacin deficiency and dependency disorders as pellagra, schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000