#food economy: fresh from the backyard

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Pictured here is home-made sauerkraut and dressing on edible weeds and flowers with sausage.  Expense:  Sausages, cabbage and dressing ingredients over meals.

Imagine taking over your own yard upkeep and developing a relationships with what nature grows.  It is not only an interesting learning experience, it’s rewarding and healthy too!  One of the biggest gifts experienced immediately is the taste.  The greens have a much more substantial flavour than anything one can get from the grocer.  Instead of eating large amounts of dressing to make up for lack of taste in the greens, a variety of different greens fresh from the backyard provide a variety of flavours.

Besides saving money the benefits are: saving time, no storage needed, and for me the biggest bonus is the nutrient content.  When it grows in the backyard it’s on natures time.  The time from being picked and eaten is minutes which means no lose of nutrition through travel of handling.  No one else has touched it!

Ingredients in this salad:

Leaves:

  • Dandelion – promotes bile secretion and supports the liver
  • Yellow Dock
  • Herb Robert – has anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory and immunogenic properties as well as a good source of nutrients
  • Mint
  • While Onion/chives
  • Plantain – leaves have astringent, diuretic and expectorant properties
  • Oxalis – lemon flavour
  • Oregano
  • Wild Violets – loaded with minerals and vitamins, especially A and C
  • Purple Dead Nettle – considered to be anti-inflammatory, diuretic, diaphoretic, astringent and styptic
  • Winter Kale
  • Clover – young leaves picked before the flowers appear can be used raw in salads
  • Ladies Mantle – it’s tannin content makes it beneficial in healing stomach ulcers, diarrhea and irritations of the throat.

 

Edible Weeds

Flowers:

  • Forget-me-nots – lower is rich in Vitamin C and Anti-oxidants
  • Oxalis
  • English Daisy – long history as a calmative for inflamed skin and for stomach and intestinal problems
  • Rosemary
  • Calendula – shown to have antispasmotic, lymphatic, cholagogue and emmenagogue actions

Edible Flowers

Non-Edible Flowers


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

s @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibletea kettle

Also known as: Punk Tree; Broadleaved Paperbark, Weeping paperbark, Broadleaf Tea Tree

Uses:  Culinary, Detergents, Medicinal, Perfume, Repellent, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Twigs

Preparation:  Tinctures, Tonic, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Toothpaste

Melaleuca leucadendra Linn., Plate 15 from “Forest Flora of New South Wales” by w:Joseph Henry Maiden (1859–1925) – wikimedia commons

  • Symbolizes: Unity & Strength
  • Element:  Ether & Space
  • Governed by:  Venus, 5th Chakra

The origin of the name Cajeput means “the sunny side of the mountain.”  It is related to tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia, with a similar but stronger camphorous aroma. It is used in Tiger Balm and in the decongestant Olbas Oil.

Properties:

  • general antiseptic
  • anti-infective
  • antiputrefactive
  • decongestioning
  • anticatarrhal
  • expectorant
  • neuralgic
  • antispasmodic agent

Culinary

Fruits and leaves of Cajeput can be used for infusing into a tea.  Oils from this tree can be used for flavouring baked goods, candies, and relishes.

Health & Wellness

Cajeput promotes circulation, reduces fevers and relieves cramps. Its herbal uses for internal use are to treat bronchitis, colds, gastric infections, headaches, roundworms, sinusitis, toothache, tuberculosis,and tumors; to loosen phlegm and as a tonic. Externally an oil of Cajeput can be applied to the skin for rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, acne, nasal congestion, sinusitis, toothache, chilblains, mites (scabies) and a fungal infection of the skin (tinea versicolor).  It is used in commercial preparations for bacterial and fungal infections in fish.

Buy Cajeput Seeds – Product # S1593


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Betony (Stachys officinalis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

MortarDyetea kettle

Betony

Also known as: common hedgenettle, betony, purple betony, wood betony, bishopwort, or bishop’s wort

Uses:  Dye, Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Poultice, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Tea, Tinctures, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Infused Water

 

 


  • Symbolizes: Protection, Purification, Love
  • Language of Flowers:  Surprise, Healing
  • Associated with: Jupiter
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus, 3rd Chakra

Properties

Betony is anthelmintic, antiseptic, astringent, carminative, mildly cathartic, cholagogue, digestive, diuretic, mildly emetic, emmenagogue, expectorant, nervine, sedative, sternutatory, tonic and vulnerary.


Culinary

The leaves can be brewed into a caffeine-free substitute for black tea similar in flavour and colour.

Health and Wellness

Betony works directly on the nervous system and is a remedy for headaches and nervous tension and in combination with its muscle relaxing properties it makes an effective remedy for sleep issues.  Betony can be taken for anxiety, headaches, pre-menstrual complaints, poor memory and tension.   It’s astringent properties makes it an effective mouth wash and topical for wounds.

Dye Plant

Picked fresh, all parts of the plants are used to make dye.  Used with Alum it produces chartreuse.

Buy Betony Seeds ←

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

Gift of Leaves & Flower Tea Blends from France

Tisanes from Faou, France

Recently I found tea blend packages anonymously left in my mailbox from a French commune.  Trying these blends I noticed the freshness of the flowers and leaves with rich, smooth and deep flavours.  Getting to know the ingredients I recognized I had many of the plants growing in my own garden.  I am excited to learn about these new blends and how I can use the resources from my own backyard!

Herbal Tea Blends from Faou, France

Morning Tea Blend

  • Black Current
  • Elderberry
  • Thyme
  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Yarrow
  • Cornflower
  • Calendula

Relaxation Tea Blend 

  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Nettles
  • Marjoram
  • Hawthorn
  • Angelique
  • Mallow – Malva

Sweet Night Tea Blend

  • Hawthorn
  • Lemon Balm
  • Tulsi – Holy Basil  (sanctum & vanna)
  • Marjoram
  • Oregon

 

Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Yellow Bedstraw (Galium verum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibleDyetea kettle

Our Lady’s Bedstraw

Also known as: Catchstraw, Cheese Rennet,  Lady’s Bedstraw, Maid’s Hair, Our Lady’s Bedstraw, Petty Mugget, Yellow Bedstraw, Yellow Cleavers

Uses:  Culinary, Dye, Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Poultice, Topical Skin Products

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Tea, Tinctures, Vinegar,Oil, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Infused Water

Photo credit:  https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lady%27s_bedstraw_(Galium_verum),_Heartwood_Forest_(28529823823).jpg

  • Symbolizes:  Love, Rejoicing, Rudeness
  • Associated with: New hope, ideas and grace. Freedom from the past, vulnerability, and release of grief and sorrow.
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus

Yellow Bed-straw was once used to stuff mattress. It has been written that Mary stuffed the bed for Baby Jesus with Yellow Bed-straw.  It has a fresh fragrance of vanilla and cut grass.

Culinary

  • The seeds are edible and can be roasted and ground into a caffeine-free, coffee substitute.
  • The young shoots can be boiled for ten to fifteen minutes as a veggie topped with butter or  added to a salad.
  • The leaves can be eaten raw or cooked.
  • The leaves and stems can be used as a curdling agent in cheese making.
  • The flowers infused in water creates a refreshing beverage.

Health and Wellness

Lady’s Bed-straw has been used for treating cancer, epilepsy, hysteria, spasms, tumors, loss of appetite, gravel, stone or urinary disorders, and chest and lung ailments. It is also used to increase urine output (as a diuretic) for relieving water retention, especially swollen ankles. It soothes reddened skin, reduces inflammation making it useful in  a poultice for cuts, skin infections, slow-healing wounds etc.

Well known Herbalist Culpepper suggested the juice from this plant for earaches.

The leaves, stems and flowering shoots are antispasmodic, astringent, diuretic, and high in C making them good for spring tonic and scurvy.  As a wash or lotion, it is said to fade freckles and sunburn and great for psoriasis.

Dye Plant

A yellow dye is made from the flowering stems and used as food colouring and hair dye, and red dyes are extracted from its roots. A yellow dye is obtained from the flowering tops.

Buy Lady Bedstraw Seeds  

 

Recent research by Schmidt et al (2014) has supported Galium verums traditional use as an anticancer remedy, as it demonstrated DNA protection against benzapyrene, a toxic compound in cigarette smoke.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Excited about Black Garlic

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

I had never heard of black garlic until receiving a black garlic fermenter as a gift.  Researching more about it and how to use it I was excited to learn about it benefits for the brain and aging.  Apparently besides protecting the heart and preventing cancer, black garlic may also help  maintain memory. Its antioxidants can reduce inflammation in the brain and help block cognitive conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease.   As a Feldenkrais®  Practitioner and someone who is aging this is great knowledge.

What is Black Garlic?  (Not to be mistaken for black garlic oil)

Garlic cloves turn black through an aging process using heat.  It was  first introduced through Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks.  With a fermenter the cloves are contained at a set temperature and humidity for 9 to 14 days.  Once taken out of the chamber they are set aside to dry and rest for a number of weeks.

The results

The black cloves are soft and gummy with a sweetness replacing the abrupt hit to the taste-buds from a raw clove.  These cloves can be used in recipes for flavouring to sauces, eaten individually or spreadable for sandwiches and used as a pizza topping.  These coves do not leave an uncomfortable garlic smell like raw cloves do.

The experience of making black garlic

Naively I set the fermenter up in the kitchen for the first batch and discovered how overpowering the smell was after a few days.  This possibly attributed to none of us getting any viruses this winter!  The second batch I set it up in a sheltered placement outside.  The one mistake I made with the first batch was to cut off the tops of the cloves.  This dried out the cloves and left them hard and too dry.  Now I leave the cloves and outer casing intact fermenting them whole.  They come out of the fermenter soft and gummy like.

Even tho the first batch was dry and hard I began munching on them to learn more about the experience.  What I noticed is that the taste changes as the cloves age.  They become sweeter and more delicate in flavour.   It was instantly recognizable how these could enhance any recipe.

I discovered how easy it is to ferment garlic cloves with a fermenter.

The experience of eating black garlic

In my research I learned that for health benefits one could eat three to four cloves a day.  I set an intention to begin to do just this while checking in with myself to notice any differences.  As a Feldenkrais® Practitioner I am interested in the relationship between good food and function.   I have experienced increased gut health eating fermented foods that directly impact brain function so I was curious and excited to find out more about any changes I would feel eating black garlic.  One of the most notable differences was calming down my fear center of the brain.  I can only describe it as food empathy!  I had experienced this once before after seeing Doctor Abraham Hoffer in the mid nineties.

Background on noticing change in brain fear center

Doctor Hoffer was researching and designing water filters for living water that I wanted to investigate.  I was on a deep detox after having a serious medical diagnosis and was learning about living water.  Doctor Hoffer was the author of many books, one in particular was the Niacin Effect.  Doctor Hoffer suggested that I take high does of  vitamins to supplement my diet. His focus was on the lack of nutrition in foods available today that was no longer feeding the brain the nutrition it needed.   Following his instructions I noticed my responses calmed down while driving.  I was normally nervous to merge in high traffic areas and within a couple of weeks I recognized I had not been having any nervous reactions at all in these circumstances.  After eating black garlic for a few days I noticed that this happened again while being a passenger in a car with my son.  I hate to admit that I had been nervous riding with him.  He is a good driver however his stops and starts have been too fast for my nervous system.  This seems to be in the past now after eating black garlic.  Now, I have no reactions to it!

I coach students to expand beyond their set patterns physically, mentally and emotionally and recognize how adding black garlic could support them to begin to take action naturally with no hesitation.  In myself I recognize it as a source of nutrition for the brain center that can block one from fear and anxiety.

I have learned that black garlic can be expensive to buy already processed.  The mesh bag of cloves above was $5.00 at a local market.  The only added expense will be the electricity.  I do not use a dishwasher, or microwave or electric pans so I this is a minor philosophical  challenge. However, worth it.

I give black garlic and this fermenter my personal recommendation.

More Fabulous Fermenting Recipes

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Read more:

Another book by Doctor Hoffer:

  • Feel Better, Live Longer With Vitamin B-3: Nutrient Deficiency and Dependency

    • Presents an unified theory of nutrient deficiency and dependency. The authors prove that large, controlled doses of vitamin B-3 or niacin, are effective in preventing, treating, and even reversing such niacin deficiency and dependency disorders as pellagra, schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Simple & healthy fermented Berry Coulis

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Blueberry Coulis – Fermented

This 750 ml jar was filled with two cups of blueberries.  Overnight they shrank to 1/4 of the jar!  Yet look at the juice.  I can’t wait to open the lid soon to blend into a coulis.  One can use blueberries, blackberries, raspberries or strawberries.  Berries are great sources of fiber, a nutrient important for a healthy digestive system.  I have just learned that in addition to being good for the heart, berries may be good for bone health!

I chose to try blueberries as they are packed with antioxidants and I have heard they support keeping one’s memory sharp in aging.

Generally I add berries to a smoothie, however finding this recipe is exciting as it will increase the berries nutrients through the fermentation process, and improve gut health and reduce inflammation.

Recipe

Equipment:

  • Mason Jar
  • Fermenting lid or cheesecloth & an elastic
  • Weights

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups mixed berries of your choice
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 2 tablespoons of water
  • ½ teaspoon packaged starter culture  or 2 tablespoons fresh whey
  • ¼ teaspoon sea salt

Process:

Pack two cups of berries in mason jar and press down with weight.  Set aside.  Add remaining ingredients into bowl to mix.  Pour over berries ensuring they are covered.  Cover top of jar and set aside for 1 to 2 days in cool space out of direct light.

After a couple of days strain the juice from the berries keeping both ingredients.  Blend the berries and slowly add juice back in to reach the consistency you want.

Story coulis in your favourite container in the fridge.  Will last for up to two months.

 

More Fabulous Fermenting Recipes

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Here are the lids and weights I purchased to make fermentation easier.  It came with a pump to burp the jars that makes it easy and  efficient.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

Read more:

http://www.eatingwell.com/article/9567/the-total-body-benefits-of-berries/