Sea Buckthorn (Hippophaë rhamnoides)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @reneelindstrom

Pic by Renee Lindstrom

Photo taken July, 2021

Pic by Renee Lindstrom

Photo taken June, 2020

Also known as:  Sea Buckhorn, Sha Ji

  • Symbolizes:  Beauty & Vitality
  • Associated with:  Venus & Mars, (Scorpio & Libra),
  • Element: Air
  • Chakra: Crown & Sacral Plexus
  • Uses:  Culinary, Dye, Flower Essences, Medicinal, Skin Products, Spells, Tea
  • Parts used:  Seeds, Berries, Flowers, Leaves, Shoots & Roots
  • Preparation: Jams, Jellies, Juices & Sauces, Cosmetics & Anti-Aging Topicals, Oils, Tea

Yellow Dye Plant

I picked up these two pots of Sea Buckthorn from a nursery at the end of the season a few years ago They were small, not well cared for and priced to sell. I thought that these were native shrubs that grew off the coastal shores of Vancouver Island and I wanted to bring them back to life. I soon learned that Sea Buckthorn is originally from the higher altitudes of the Himalayas that spread across Europe, Asia and North America. They reduce soil erosion and add nitrogen to the soil. They are a good as a nutritional food and medicinal crop. These two potted shrubs are each a male and a female. For every 3 female shrubs one needs a male for pollination. These are hardy plants that I have discovered grow in the Canadian Prairies which is hot in summer and cold in winter.

Health & Wellness

​Sea Buckthorn berries are becoming recognized as a modern superfood. The berries and leaves are high in quercetin making them popular in Tibetan, Ayurvedic and Chinese medicines which have traditionally used them to promote digestion, enhance one’s immune system, as an expectorant and demulcent in the treatment of colds and flu.  The Ancient Greeks recognised its anti-aging and beautifying properties, The berries are a source of potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron​, phosphorus​m ​folate, biotin and vitamins B1, B2, B6, C and E​.​ Oil from the leaves and seeds may be one of the only plant foods known to provide all four omega fatty acids — omega-3, omega-6, omega-7 and omega-9.

Alexander the Great is said to have witnessed his horses eating the berries and then noticed afterwards noticed their shinier coats, their increased vitality and quicker recovery times from injuries. He named these berries Hippophae, which comes from the Greek words hippos and phaos, meaning “shining horse.”

Pedanius Dioscorides, ancient Greek father of Pharmacology wrote about the healing qualities of sea buckthorn berries in his 5-volume pharmacological encyclopedia De Materia Medica, which was a text on herbal medicine used for over 1,500 years during the first century AD.

Personal cultivation of Sea Buckthorn & recommendations

After caring for a male and female shrub for the past two seasons I have recognized their hardiness even while in pots. Learning about them through this relationship, while researching their edible and medicinal uses, my intention is to begin drying the leaves and berries for remedies, teas and snacks while using them fresh from the shrub. I will try to propagate them from cutting and seeds and explore how to increase the number of plants while exploring them as a superfood and the medicinal attributes. My hope is to expand my relationship with these plants by integrating them more fully into my lifestyle. I believe they could become a beneficial food and medicinal staple. I would recommend them to those yearning to create a self sustaining food, healing, dye or crop garden.

Buy Canadian Sea Buckthorn Plants

Sea Buckthorn Oil
Sea Buckthorn Berries

Recommended Reading

Sea Buckthorn Berry Ideas

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.  Do not use if you are pregnant!

Copyright 2014 – 2021  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

pic by Renee Lindstrom

Also known as: Liquorice

  • Symbolizes:  Sweetness
  • Associated with:  Venus & Mars, (Scorpio & Leo),
  • Element: Water
  • Chakra: Root
  • Uses:  Culinary, Dye, Flavouring, Incense, Medicinal, Skin Products, Spellwork, Sweetener, Tea
  • Parts used:  Root
  • Preparation: Alcohol Distilling, Flower Essence, Incense, Lotions, Mouthwash, Ointments, Oils, , Potpourri, Soap-making, Shampoo, Tobacco, Tea, Tinctures, Toothpaste, , Infused Water

Black Dye Plant

This potted Licorice Plant has been overwintered in an unheated #yyj garden greenhouse. I was excited to view it reemerge in early spring. It’s hardier than it appears. This week #yyj has just experienced two highest on record heat temperatures ever, one day after another. This Licorice plant has not only survived, it’s thrived! If it hadn’t been kept wet, it wouldn’t have though as it likes to have moist soil. Originally from the Mediterranean and Central Asia it is experiencing Victoria’s mild winters and interestly hot summers. I have read it will grow from 3 to 5 feet tall and spread at least 3 feet. Easy spreader.

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Health & Wellness

The Licorice ​plant fruit​s, ​leaves and ​roots are considered to have medicinal qualities​ although the most common part used are the roots. (The fruits are formed from the flowers similar to the legume family of plants.) The roots are harvested from your garden after three years, five for commercially grown operations. Licorice has a flavour that one either loves or hates. antiviral and antimicrobial properties.

Buy Canadian Licorice Seeds

Recommended Reading


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.  Do not use if you are pregnant!

Copyright 2014 – 2021  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Clary (Salvia sclarea)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Edible, Medicinal, Dye

Clary is a Herb grown for its oil

Clary

Also known as: Clary Sage, Clear Eye, Eyebright, Clarywort

Enhances the connection between conscious & unconscious mind, & encourages release of stagnant emptions

  • Symbolizes:  Lifting one’s spirit
  • Associated with:  Power of the Moon &  Mercury, Cancer, Pisces & Capricorn
  • Element:  Water
  • Chakras:  Sacral & 3rd Eye
  • Energetic Properties:  Warming, euphoric, dreamy
  • Uses:  Culinary, Dream Work, Dye, Eye Wash, Flavouring, Incense, Love Spells Medicinal, Meditation, Skin Products, Spellwork, Sweetener, Tonic
  • Parts used:  Flowers, Stems, Leaves & Roots
  • Preparation: Alcohol Distilling, Flower Essence, Essential Oil, Fragrance, Incense, Lotions, Mouthwash, Ointments, Oils, Perfume, Potpourri, Soap-making, Shampoo, Tobacco, Tea, Tinctures, Toothpaste, , Infused Water

Dark Brown Dye Plant

This Clary plant pictured is in its second year of growth in #yyj garden.  A biennial started from seed in 2020, has a  flower stalk that has grown to 6 feet or more.  After exploring the two year cycle and benefits of this flowering plant a decision to include it permanently in the garden has been made and it will be put beside another 6 foot tall biennial, the Mullein plant.

The Clary plant has a hint of fur on it’s leaves similar to Mullein, however it flowers are lavender and white with a deep fragrance, while Mulleins flowers are bright yellow with a light sweet smell.  The shape of the leaves and stalks are not alike at all.  Clary stalks are square and narrow with bud bursts along the stalk.  Mullein has a large thick stalk with flowers buds overcrowding the space.  Side by stid they will make attractive companions in the garden.

Not only attractive both Clary and Mullein add benefits to one’s lifestyle through their available uses and qualities.

Health & Wellness uses of Clary,  

  • Antibacterial Properties
  • Anti-inflammatory properties
  • Antidepressant
  • Antispasmodic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Appetite Stimulant
  • A​stringent properties
  • Eyewash
  • Menopause
  • PMS
  • Stress Reduction

Meditation, Chakras, Dreaming, Emotional & Visionary States

  • Enhances state of consciousness
  • Enhances dream & visionary states
  • Aids in opening the Third Eye
  • Improves mediumship​, clairvoyance​, confidence
  • Induces trance states
  • Promotes emotional understanding

Buy Canadian Clary Seeds & Plants

Recommended Reading


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.  Do not use if you are pregnant!

Copyright 2014 – 2021  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Wild Tobaco (Nicotiana rustica)

Not Edible Not edible

Other names:  Aztec Tobacco

Uses:  Ceremonial, Insecticide  & Seed Saving

#yyj Harvest:  Seed Pods & Leaves – first week of September

 

 

 

 

 


Drying Leaves

Wild tobacco is considered poisonous though was traditionally used by North American Indians for skin wounds and rashes.  It is still in use  during ceremonies. Nine times more potent than cultivated tobaccos, with more nicotine, it is a source of nicotine sulfate, an insecticide for the control of aphids, thrips, whiteflies and mites.

I grow it specifically for ceremonial uses and suggest keeping it away from small pets and children.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Dandelion Wine

This year the exploration with Dandelions went beyond jelly and dried leaves and roots into fermenting a wine.  What a wonderful experiment it turned out to be.  I explored two ways of processing these flowers.  One with yeast added and one left to ferment naturally.  Pictured is the natural ferment which pulls in yeast from the environment.  This batch was put to ferment on April 18th, 2020 and it was left to sit until June 10th, 2020.  Almost a full two months.

Upon straining the liquid from the brew the smell of wine alcohol was evident.  I was surprised by the inner excitement and amazement I felt.  Since leaving the food and beverage industry wine hadn’t been a big part of life once having kids that was followed by pursuing focused awareness on somatic learning and connections.  Now in this adventure I couldn’t wait to try a glass.  It turned out to be a very good glass of wine.  A week before filtering it I had a sample and it was still too sweet for my liking.  Someone who likes sweet wine could decant it sooner than I did.

After filtering it and putting it into bottles for another few days before pouring a glass I was met with a pop upon opening the bottle.  It was as strong as opening a corked champagne bottle.  This means it was still in a fermenting process. I wouldn’t want to leave these bottles capped much longer without letting some air in!

After working late in the garden and sitting down at my desk with this glass was a treat.  Adding to the experience was the connection to picking the dandelion flowers myself, processing them, and then adding them into a mixture for a  fermenting process.  Very satisfying.

The second experiment with added yeast is not ready to be filtered and bottled yet.  I will compare the two once it is.  Until then I will continue to find pleasure at the memory of pleasure from success with a new recipe adventure.

For me a difference between this wine and commercial wine is the aliveness of it.  It seems to activate my mouth in away that enlivens it as the liquid first makes contact.  I am curious if the added yeast dandelion wine will give the same reaction.

For more on the recipe for Dandelion Wine……….


Read more:

Wild Winemaking: Easy & Adventurous Recipes Going Beyond Grapes, Including Apple Champagne, Ginger–Green Tea Sake, Key Lime–Cayenne Wine, and 142 More by Richard W. Bender 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Naturally Fermented Dandelion Wine Recipe

All the lovely scientific information you may wish to read is available to research on line.  This is the basic and simple recipe I used that created enjoyable results for me.

Equipment

  • Bean Crock Pot
  • Strainer
  • Measuring Cup
  • Kitchen Pot
  • Cheese Cloth or Cotton
  • Balloons
  • Bottles & toppers

Ingredients

  • 4 cups Dandelion Flower Heads
  • 2 cups Sugar
  • 8 cups Water
  • 1 Orange ( 1 tablespoon Zest, 1/4 cup juice & slices)
  • Lemon (1 tablespoon Zest)
  • Lime (1 tablespoon juice)
  • Handful Raisins
  • 1/2 teaspoon Ginger, dried or fresh
  • Cloves

 #1 – Freshly Picked Flower Head Preparation

After picking the flower heads they must be washed and then pick off as much of the green base as possible.  This is an important step as the green base of the flower petals creates a strong bitter flavour that overpowers the petals.  Once the flower petals are ready add them to crock pot with water and let steep for 24 hours.

I rinse Dandelion Flower Heads in my homemade Apple Cider Vinegar Bath followed by a freshwater bath

#2 – Prep with the ingredients

After the flower petals have rested in water for two days, place them in a clean pot bringing water back up to 4 quarts adding sugar, citrus zests, orange & lime juices, raisins cloves and ginger.  Bring this mixture to a soft boil for up to an hour.

#3 – Crock Pot to Ferment 

(I leave flower petals in ferment however one can filter them out before adding mixture to crock pot)

After cooking to infuse the mixture for an hour pour back into the crock pot and cover with orange slices.  Cover the crock pot with cotton and put pot aside in cool dark space to rest and infuse.

#4 – Fermenting complete

Once the fermenting process is complete (stops bubbling) this brew can be filtered through cheesecloth or strainer and poured into bottles.  These bottle can be put away for 6 months to age before drinking them.

If one is uncertain about the fermentation process being complete a balloon can be placed over the bottle to observe if it expands.  If it expands it is still fermenting.  Leave ballon on until fermentation stops before corking.

#5 – Enjoy or give as gifts

Once the bottle has rested enjoy or gift away as gifts during the holiday season.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum)

 

Also known as:  Saint Roberts, Red Robin, Storksbill, Dragons Blood, Blood Wort, Cranesbill Herb

Uses: Adaptogen, antibiotic, antiviral, antioxidant, astringent, antitumour, diuretic to lower blood sugar, blood cleanser, diarrhea, digestive, dysentery, eyewash for inflamed eyes, gargle, gout, immune booster, increase energy and oxygen at cellular level, jaundice, poultice for lactating breast hardness, bruising and rheumatism pain, skin wash for ulcers and herpes sores, sedative, styptic for nosebleeds and wounds, clean up toxic metals and radiation in the environment.

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves, Stems & Roots

Preparation: Culinary, Flower Essence, Remedy, Repellent,Tea, Tincture, tonic

 


  • Symbolizes:   listening to intuition, weaving heart & mind together
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Steadfastness
  • Associated with: Sacral Chakra,  Throat Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Venus
  • Mineral Companions:  Blue Lace Agate & Clear Quartz

Dr. Otto Warburg, winner of Nobel Prize has stated:

“The prime cause of cancer is lack of oxygenation of the cells.” 

Germanium is a master oxygenator which means it has the ability to increase the oxygen flow into the human cells.  Increasing available oxygen to the cells increases the immune systems ability to fight off free radicals and illness.   Dr Warburg discovered that cancer cells could only exist in an anaerobic state created by a lack of oxygen which reduces the cells ability to regenerate.  An anaerobic state of the cells is the start of experiencing pain, disease, wayward cells and cancer.

Germanium also stimulates electrical impulses at a cellular level which is an additional benefit of consuming it in our eating plan.   Its remarkable effects have been documented in medical journals where it has been described as an energy and immune builder, preventative, and an adaptogen for alleviating minor or major health imbalances.

Herb Roberts contains volatile oil, tannin, Vitamins; A, B. and C, and calcium, potassium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus.  ellagic acid and geraniin compounds, and germanium.

This plant will be one of the first plants to grow in areas containing chemical waste like areas along railway ties that leave deposits of heavy metals in the soil or under electrical lines that leave radiation in the soil.


This herb was introduced by a new neighbour who left it growing in flower pots along the side of their house that  faced ours.  As luck would have it when its flowers turned into seed pods and dried, they exploded spraying seeds everywhere.   These past two years Herb Roberts has been readily available to munch on, infuse into tea, create oils and tinctures and then dry.

This year due to COVID 19, I have begun creating a daily infusion to drink during the day to increase my immune system and metabolism.  

When adding garden plant parts to infuse in water under the sun during the day, what I notice the most when drinking it is that it’s softer and somehow I am left feeling an increase in hydration.  More so than when drinking tap water.  Others things I notice is the flavour and aliveness of the water, which is 100 times greater than bottled water.

Once drinking freshly infused water with garden plants I can easily differentiate between the hard dead bottled water and the soft aliveness of freshly infused water.  There is immediate physical relief and sense of wet hydration that is missing when compared to the hard water that can actually choke on the way down.   Now with the addition of Herb Roberts plant parts this sense of hydration is even higher.

Shortly after the birth of my second child I had my own cancer scare.

Just prior to my children’s birth my interest had been focused on herbology and then while having babies I studied homeopathic remedies to assist during their development and health stages.   Having been exposed to these philosophies I decided to have a dialogue with my Doctor about pursuing alternative health care for a time before going into the acute care of Western medicine.   During this pursuit I was lucky enough to tap into the expanding consciousness of that time.  A focus on structured water was just emerging.  What I learned was that water only entered into our cells to clean them of debris and hydrate them if the water had the same structure as when flowing over minerals and debris in the running waters of the stream and rivers.   Having that experience now when introducing infused waters with plant parts I can easily recognize  the similarities.  Cheaper?,  yes!  Convenient?, yes!

What truly gets me excited about infusing Herb Roberts with water is from experiencing this:

Another learning experience during my cancer scare was quite accidental.   This incident introduced the importance of the body’s electrical field to me. I couldn’t access a particular supplement locally so I had to order it.  When I moved towards it as it arrived I felt an electric field around my body engage.  I was shocked and looked around to see the source of the electricity.  Then when I picked up the box my hand chakra came alive.  My whole mood shifted and I remember a smile of pleasure come over me.  Wanting to have more clarity I began to research this phenomena.  I learned about the body and cell electrical field.  What I discovered is that the cell can only absorb what it electrically aligns with.   Hydration is important for the cell to flush and hydrate however it can only do this with water that is electrically designed so it can enter the cell.  If it’s not in alignment the cell doesn’t let the water in.  Knowing this has created an excitement around this little wild herb.

Buy Canadian Herb Roberts Seeds 

If you cannot grow and pick your own purchase dried Herb Roberts 

Follow Living Natures Love on TwitterInstagram or Facebook

 

The Detox Miracle Sourcebook: Raw Foods and Herbs for Complete Cellular Regeneration – by Author: Robert S. Morse N.D. 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Solomon’s Seal (Polygonatum biflorum)

EdibleMortartea kettle

Solomons Seal

Also known as:  Dropberry,  Lady’s Seals,  Sealroot, Sealwort,  Solomon Seal, St. Mary’s Seal

Uses: Anti-inflammatory, Blood Pressure, Boils & Rashes, Bone Injuries, Bruises, Culinary, Digestive, Expectorant,  Insect Bites, Medicinal, Muscular-Skeletal support, Pain Relief, Piles, Tumours

Parts used:  Flowers, roots/rhizomes & new shoots *Berries are poisonous

Preparation: creams, Flower Essences, Herbal Tea, New shoots boiled like Asparagus, Poultice, Salve, Sleep Aid, Spray, Tincture, Topical Skin & Cosmetic Products


  • Symbolizes:  Protection
  • Associated with:  Brow Chakra
  • Element:  Earth
  • Governed by:  Saturn

 


Considered one of the top 10 healing plants in Asia
& of great value by early North Americans & Europeans

As a cosmetic Culpepper says:

‘the diluted water of the whole plant used to the face or other parts of the skin, cleanses it from freckles, spots or any marks whatever, leaving the place fresh, fair and lovely, for which purpose it is much used by the Italian ladies and is the principal ingredient of most of the cosmetics and beauty washes advertised by perfumers at high price.’

 

Solomon’s Seal Roots are used in treating a variety of ailments.  Some ways they have been used are:

  • blood cleanser
  • blood pressure
  • restoring damaged cartilage and connecting tissue.
  • easing inflammation, bruising, wounds and skin irritations.
  • healing bone injuries (broken, stressed) and associated connective tissues
  • increasing synovial fluid to reduce grinding in joints.
  • toning tendons, ligaments, joints and attachments associated with repetitive stress, injury and inflammation.
  • upset stomach
  • loosening mucous in lungs
  • pain relief
  • reproductive health
  • sleeping aid

Bones, Ligaments, Muscles, Soft Tissue, Synovial fluid

Solomon Seal can support healing of acute trauma to the body’s muscles, tendons, ligaments, bones, joints and cartilage. It encourages tightening or loosening of muscles, ligaments, and tendons as needed; helping damaged tissues return to their original states; creating a balance that can correct old injuries and help prevent new ones; and helping the body produce more or better quality synovial fluid so that joints have less friction. It has been used to support recovery from surgery.

Brain

Solomon’s Seal can support increased mental clarity, concentration, and sleep.

Heart & Blood

Solomon’s Seal has been used to lower blood pressure and clean blood.  It also lowers blood sugar.

Pain

Solomon’s Seal supports relief from pain.

Respiratory

Solomon’s Seal helps to clear congestion and loosen mucous in the lungs and soothe throat irritation.

Skin

Solomon’s Seal can be used as a poultice on boils, skin irritations and bruising.

Buy Canadian  Dried Roots – Bulk

Buy Canadian Spring Plants

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

#food economy: fresh from the backyard

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Pictured here is home-made sauerkraut and dressing on edible weeds and flowers with sausage.  Expense:  Sausages, cabbage and dressing ingredients over meals.

Imagine taking over your own yard upkeep and developing a relationships with what nature grows.  It is not only an interesting learning experience, it’s rewarding and healthy too!  One of the biggest gifts experienced immediately is the taste.  The greens have a much more substantial flavour than anything one can get from the grocer.  Instead of eating large amounts of dressing to make up for lack of taste in the greens, a variety of different greens fresh from the backyard provide a variety of flavours.

Besides saving money the benefits are: saving time, no storage needed, and for me the biggest bonus is the nutrient content.  When it grows in the backyard it’s on natures time.  The time from being picked and eaten is minutes which means no lose of nutrition through travel of handling.  No one else has touched it!

Ingredients in this salad:

Leaves:

  • Dandelion – promotes bile secretion and supports the liver
  • Yellow Dock
  • Herb Robert – has anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory and immunogenic properties as well as a good source of nutrients
  • Mint
  • While Onion/chives
  • Plantain – leaves have astringent, diuretic and expectorant properties
  • Oxalis – lemon flavour
  • Oregano
  • Wild Violets – loaded with minerals and vitamins, especially A and C
  • Purple Dead Nettle – considered to be anti-inflammatory, diuretic, diaphoretic, astringent and styptic
  • Winter Kale
  • Clover – young leaves picked before the flowers appear can be used raw in salads
  • Ladies Mantle – it’s tannin content makes it beneficial in healing stomach ulcers, diarrhea and irritations of the throat.

 

Edible Weeds

Flowers:

  • Forget-me-nots – lower is rich in Vitamin C and Anti-oxidants
  • Oxalis
  • English Daisy – long history as a calmative for inflamed skin and for stomach and intestinal problems
  • Rosemary
  • Calendula – shown to have antispasmotic, lymphatic, cholagogue and emmenagogue actions

Edible Flowers

Non-Edible Flowers


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

s @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibletea kettle

Also known as: Punk Tree; Broadleaved Paperbark, Weeping paperbark, Broadleaf Tea Tree

Uses:  Culinary, Detergents, Medicinal, Perfume, Repellent, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Twigs

Preparation:  Tinctures, Tonic, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Toothpaste

Melaleuca leucadendra Linn., Plate 15 from “Forest Flora of New South Wales” by w:Joseph Henry Maiden (1859–1925) – wikimedia commons

  • Symbolizes: Unity & Strength
  • Element:  Ether & Space
  • Governed by:  Venus, 5th Chakra

The origin of the name Cajeput means “the sunny side of the mountain.”  It is related to tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia, with a similar but stronger camphorous aroma. It is used in Tiger Balm and in the decongestant Olbas Oil.

Properties:

  • general antiseptic
  • anti-infective
  • antiputrefactive
  • decongestioning
  • anticatarrhal
  • expectorant
  • neuralgic
  • antispasmodic agent

Culinary

Fruits and leaves of Cajeput can be used for infusing into a tea.  Oils from this tree can be used for flavouring baked goods, candies, and relishes.

Health & Wellness

Cajeput promotes circulation, reduces fevers and relieves cramps. Its herbal uses for internal use are to treat bronchitis, colds, gastric infections, headaches, roundworms, sinusitis, toothache, tuberculosis,and tumors; to loosen phlegm and as a tonic. Externally an oil of Cajeput can be applied to the skin for rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, acne, nasal congestion, sinusitis, toothache, chilblains, mites (scabies) and a fungal infection of the skin (tinea versicolor).  It is used in commercial preparations for bacterial and fungal infections in fish.

Buy Cajeput Seeds – Product # S1593


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000