Best Way to Spend Easter Ever!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

by Renee Lindstrom

Tinctures, Oils, Herbs & Vinegar’s

In the picture above there are rosemary wine vinegar’s and tinctures in 100 percent vodka, dandelion and English daisy flowers in oil, wine vinegar  and vodka and dandelion roots in vodka.  There are also rosemary branches for hanging in one’s home and loose for tea!

As I hear others Easter Stories I am more than ever thankful for one that was spend focused upon foraging, drying and creating!  So much expectation is put upon these gatherings and I hear back that they are never met.  These are stories of anticipation to connect that in reality is met with disappointment and conflict.  Hearing this,  I am reminded of the appreciation I felt that was an outcome of exploring ways to create with weeds, flowers, herbs and plants growing in the area.  It was not trying to force appreciation just simply because it’s an anniversary of someone else’s achievements.

Appreciation, for me, is an outcome of a personal connection to something experienced.  Acknowledgment and devotion, for me, is reflecting upon an anniversary of some event outside myself that is meaningful enough to long for integration of those qualities.

I am almost shy to say it!  After a long day playing in the garden I felt a tremendous sense of well-being spontaneously arise.  It was a deep connection to the garden, the space I was in, myself and my girl cat that was beside me.  I could only describe this as being completely connected and in touch in the moment.  It was calming, healing and wonderful.

Oh and I can’t forget, part way through the day it was time to consider lunch. Keeping with the theme of  foraging and using the plants and flowers at hand a beautiful lunch was made.  It included tempura dandelion flowers that are simply delicious!  This was one of the nicest spring lunches!

by Renee Lindstrom

Easter Sunday Lunch

Yes you can eat Hens n’ chicks!  Similar to cucumber.

What did you do for Easter!  Was it enriching or draining?  Consider your choices. Are you doing this for you or for someone else.  If you are doing this for someone else how can they possibly live up to your expectations?

Read more on how to Infuse Wildflower Oils


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 Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Can you make tea from your herb n’ flowers you use in your infused baths?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

2017-03-25 11.57.36

Herbs, Flowers ‘n Roots

As part of the infusing  process for a soothing and healing bathing experience I have begun to make tea from the same herbs, flowers and roots as those I use.   I find the experience of drinking the tea as I draw a bath full-filling.  It is satisfying to be treating the outside as great as the inside! For a few moments in my week I am connecting to a fuller awareness of the inside-outside connections.

The herbs, flowers and roots used in this early spring tea and infusion were; feverfew, mullein, butterfly vine, calendula, peony and Nootka rose flowers, mullein, feverfew, celery leaves, spruce needles, and mullein root.  I choose these plants as they are beginning to come to life in our garden and indoors as they sprout from seed.


Become aware of the relationship to what foods & medicinal’s you invite into your experience, inside and outside, for radiant health.  Developing one’s connection to the plants, herbs and trees through gardening, eating and harvesting them increases the body’s alignment to their qualities, whether eating or making healing products (tinctures, oils, teas, and poultice’s) with them.  If you plant seeds, do what the aboriginal gardeners and seed collectors  of Southern Countries still do today, soak the seeds in your mouth a moment before planting!  Now that is an intentional connection!!!!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

‘Uncovering the healing powers in your own garden’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Have you taken time to explore what plants you have in your garden that you can use to make your own healing teas, use to add a shine to your hair or revive your skin!

Bay Leaf Laurel

Bay Leaf Laurel

Some of my favorites can be used to add spice to recipes, make a soothing tea and to use as a skin and hair tonic.  These include; rosemary, bay leaf, fennel, hens and chicks and bamboo!  Salads  are a treat with; dandelion, yellow dock and hosta leaves or pansy, nasturtium or gladioli flowers!  I keep hens and chicks close by for burns, nose bleeds and bug bites!

Over time I have become a dedicated forger and gardener.  It has been a slow integration that transitioned into a relationship after spending time to explore the benefits of what was growing in my yard.    Getting to know these plants more intimately has brought a whole new experience to my lifestyle!

Since the spring of 2016 I have begun to make home-made hand and body soap using oils made from my landscape.  I make my own flavored vinegar and waters, and teas  from fresh or dried plant materials from my yard.   This past season I used cough syrup that I made from plants I foraged along the Pacific Ocean and used medicinal tinctures infused from fresh plant materials foraged and picked from your garden.

It has been a journey that I hadn’t planned.  It started with a curiosity and will to explore.  Do I recommend that others begin to forage in their own communities and explore the medicinal qualities of their own garden plants?  Yes I do.  I believe that this activity will create healthier, happier people who will care about their environment.  For me, I describe it as an inner activist movement.

I also encourage others to explore what plants can be recycled!  Your veggies such as celery, onions, beets, cabbage and potatoes can be regrown from the ends that you throw away!  Next time you go to compost or throw them out, pause and explore how you can re-growth them!

I urge you to begin planning your garden so that you can create your own living outdoor medicine cabinet.

Here is a list of some of the garden plants I have explored in my garden – Berries, Edible Flowers, Garden Plants, Trees, Veggies & Weeds for your Healing Garden


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.