Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdible

Ashwagandha

 

 

Also Known as:  Indian ginseng, winter cherry & Somnifera Root

Uses:  Culinary, Medicinal, Incense

Parts used:  Seeds, Flowers and Leaves

Preparation:  Culinary, Drinks, Poultice, Smoothies, Tea Infusion, Tincture,  Nervine Tonic, Vinegar

 

 

 

  • Symbolizes: aphrodisiac, longevity and an elixir of life
  • Meaning:  Smell (Roots smell like a horse)
  • Associated with:  Healing, Passion, Youthfulness,  Root Chakra
  • Element:  Fire
  • Governed by:  Sun

This winter I integrated Ashwagandha root powder into my diet.  Immediately my energy levels went up and I slept better.  Things I had been putting off and not doing began to get done without any negative thoughts and draining energy.

I am so enthralled with this plant and it benefits I am growing one to better acquaint myself with its appearance, growth cycle and energy.  I have learned that the Ashwagandha seeds do not stay viable for very long so one must get them as fresh as possible.

Health & Wellness

Ashwagandha is considered an adaption herb in Ayurveda due to its benefits of improving vitality, enhancing longevity in the body and mind overall.  Adaption herbs simultaneously enhance adrenal function while also helping an individual relax and sleep better.  Adaptogens are multi-organ targeting herbs that enable a general state of well-being and longevity and they normalize levels of HPA hormones, raising those that are low, while lowering those that are excessively elevated.

Ashwagandha is known for its ability to prevent the damaging effects of stress to the organs, and enabling deep protection on a multi-organ level, assisting the body in adaptation to life.  It has been included in Ayurveda recipes since the beginning of this practice.

The leaves of the Ashwagandha are brewed into a tea for weight-loss while the roots provide a powerful nervine tonic that strengthens the bodies response to stress, increases energy levels, improves sleep, cognitive function and ability to protect the brain against damage. This herb contains flavonoids and antioxidants, alkaloids, amino acids (including tryptophan), neurotransmitters, sterols, tannins, lignans and triterpenes. Research has also shown the roots have anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, antioxidant, immunomodulary and hemopoetic properties.

Well researched benefits of Ashwagandha are:

  • Thyroid function
  • Adrenal fatigue
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Blood sugar levels
  • Cancer & tumors
  • Brain cell degeneration & memory
  • Immune function
  • Stamina & endurance
  • Muscle strength
  • Sexual function & fertility
  • Weight-loss

The International Journal of Home Science has published the following nutritional breakdown of 1,000 milligrams of dehydrated Ashwagandha root powder.  It contains:

2.5 calories
0.04 gram protein
0.032 gram fiber
0.05 gram carbohydrates
0.03 milligram iron
0.02 milligram calcium
0.08 microgram carotene
0.06 milligram vitamin C

Buy Canadian Bulk Ashwagandha Root Powder

Buy Canadian Ashwagandha Plants 

Recommended Reading:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

 

 

Jade Plants (Crassula argentea)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

 


Also known as: lucky plant, money plant or money tree

  • Symbolizes:  prosperity, success, motivation to start new projects, harmony, health, luck, creativity, friendship
  • Element:  Water
  • Uses:  Remedy, Topical Skin Products
  • Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Root
  • Preparation: Tea, Topical Skin Remedy

The Jade Plant is native to South Africa and Mozambique.  This succulent plant with small pink or white flowers has become a symbol for friendship and abundance in Asian philosophies and being adopted in the West.  Giving a  Jade plant as a gift reflects friendship and if in bloom, a  great friendship making it a popular birthdays and Christmas gift. The green leaves signify energy and the joy of friendship, and the flowers represent the fragrance of great friendship.

In the Northern regions the Jade plant blooms at Christmas with small white flowers that are beautiful and fragrant.  A flowering Jade plant reflects luck and prosperity.

In their Feng Shui traditions the placement of a Jade plant would be in these following ways:

  • Business owners – placed near the entrance, or in a southeast location to bring prosperity and success. During the Chinese New Year celebrations, Jade Plants are set on top of stock and investment certificates so they will increase in value during the coming year.
  • Homes – east locations for family harmony, health, initiation of projects, scholarly pursuits; in southeast locations for wealth luck; in west locations for creativity or children luck; and in northwest locations for the luck of mentors, teachers and helpful people.
Here in the West the Jade plant has become known as a great plant for the interior environment as an air cleaner.  It is an easy plant to care for and can be left for long periods without concern.  As a succulent it stores water.  It is recommended that it dry out between watering and then be given a good soak.

Jade Plant

I became the steward of three large jade plants that had been left in a vacant home for and unknown period of time.  A few years I imagine based on the condition of the house.  These Jade plants had been left in their small 4 inch pots quite possibly for 15 to 20 years.  The wood on the plant suggests that they where not young ones.  Once replanted into large pots they took some time to recover and during this transition roots began to grow from the branches.  Some of the branches with roots fell and either re-potted themselves at the base of the trunk or where easily transplanted.  I have not has this ease in transplanting Jade shoots  in the past.  These Jades then began to bloom in the late fall which I had also not experienced in past years.
These big Jade are still recovering and are not filled out with leaves, however they have started many healthy and fast growing plants.
These are easy plants to care for and have success with.

Read more:

 

Follow @Inside Lifestyle news on TwitterInstagram  Pinterest or Facebook


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Staghorn Fern Garden Art

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

 

The Staghorn fern mounted in a wooden bowl is a housewarming gift for my son.  As soon as I held the Staghorn inside the bowl I knew it would be stunning.  It is!

This has been a fun way of creating with plants that is unique.  These ferns are native to southern regions of Mexico and they hang from the trees.  Similar to air plants n that they can grow without rooting into soil.  They have two types of leaves; a basil leaf and Staghorn leaves.  The basil leaf will grow over the root and attach the plant to the tree.  Read more on planting and enjoying Staghorn Ferns.

In the next set of pictures, these Staghorn Ferns have been combined with Succulents, Sedum, Barren Strawberries, Wandering Jew and Moss to create a hanging basket.  In the Greater Victoria Regions these baskets can be hung outside in Spring through to Fall except on colder days and evenings.  The Staghorn Fern does not like full sun and would do best in shaded areas.

 

  • Succulents (Sedum) symbolize enduring and timeless love, money and wealth, and peace and tranquility
  • Ferns symbolize eternal youth, good luck for new love, new beginnings and life, family and hope for future generations, and humility and sincerity

Each of these plants are more than house and garden features.  They can be used in remedies and teas for those interested in engaging in integrating a eco-lifestyle for health and well-being.  Read more on different plants at Flower Plants Page.  

 


Read more:

 

Follow @Inside Lifestyle news on TwitterInstagram  Pinterest or Facebook


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Kiwi seedlings transplanted into the garden!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles

Buy living foods!

Here are pictures of the Kiwi seedlings after being transplanted into the garden. These seedlings were started from store bought fruit this past January, 2018. To read more on how to prepare Kiwi seeds for sprouting go to
https://livingnatureslove.blog/2018/01/14/grow-your-own-kiwi-from-your-own-fruit-bowl/.

 

Living in Natures Love strives to inspire connections with ‘living foods.’

 

Crackerjack Marigold (Tagetes erecta)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

DyeMortartea kettleEdible

Crackerjack Marigold

Also known as:  American Marigold,  , or Aztec Marigold

Uses:  Culinary, Food Dye, Herbal Tea, Medicinal, Poultice, Topical Skin & Eyes (against aging), Laxative, Insecticide effect in soil

Parts used:  Leaves, Flowers, Roots

Preparation: Fresh, Dried, Flower Essence, Infusion, Decoction, Poultice

 

 

 

  • Symbolizes:  Herb of the Sun
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Cruelty, Grief, Jealousy
  • Associated with:  Leo and Sacral Chakra
  • Element:  Fire
  • Governed by:  Sun

Culinary 

  • Flowers

The Crackerjack Marigold flower can be used fresh in salads, casseroles, omelettes or stir fried alone or with vegetables.  These flowers are pleasantly bitter to them that adds flavour and colour and made into a  dressing, be infused in water or for making tea.  The flower is used as a substitute for Saffron to colour dishes.  The flowers can be used fresh or picked to dry for later use in the kitchen.

Health and Wellness

  • Flowers, Leaves & Roots

The Cracker Jack Marigold is capable of destroying parasitic worms, in particular human intestinal helminthsis (worms).   It is also used as a digestive (for gas), diuretic, sedative and to stimulate menstrual flow.  It is rich in the anti-oxidant lutenist which is a compound that studies suggest may improve visual acuity in patients with retinal degeneration.

  • Fresh or dried Crackerjack Marigold flowers can be used internally for indigestion, colic, severe constipation, coughs and dysentery, and topically for sores, ulcers, eczema. sore eyes and rheumatism.  They can be made into a strong infusion to treat colds, mumps and as protection for the eyes from the ravages of sun and aging.
  • Fresh Crackerjack Marigold leaves are used  topically as a paste to treat boils, carbuncles and earaches.
  • Crackerjack Marigold roots are used as a laxative.

 

As a Flower Essence:

Crackerjack Marigold Flower Essence enhances right brain function and strengthens ones intuition.  It improves communication in relationships by lessening the need for concrete proof in what one is hearing thereby improving listening abilities.  Marigold supports growth, change and protects from viruses in our energy field.  Marigold can increase the understanding of academic material.


  • Natural Insecticide

Crackerjack Marigold’s make a wonderful garden companion flower for their insecticidal properties to reduce infestations of bugs that are not beneficial to garden plants.  This is a combination of scent and secretion that stays in the soil for a few months after they are no longer in the bed.

 

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Buy Canadian African Marigold Seeds

 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


 

Pacific Northwest Red Currant (Ribes sanguineum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Edible

by Renee Lindstrom

Pacific Northwest Red Current

Also known as:  Flowering Currant. Pink Winter Currant

Uses:  Culinary

Parts Used:  Berries, Flowers

Preparation: Fresh, Stewed, Dried, Syrup,  Jelly, Tea, Flower Essence

Taste:  Sweet with astringent aftertaste


 

 

 

 

  • Associated with:  Root Chakra

Culinary

This bush is considered an ornamental in our local communities.  There isn’t much foraging information about the Pacific Northwest Red Current.  The berry has a strong aftertaste and is extremely astringent.  It is an edible and medicinal that was once used until other useful plants began to sprout and become available.   It was dried, made into fruit leather, jelly and syrup and stewed, and eaten fresh.  It was usually added to other foods.

 

Back to #yyj Non-Native Winter Flowering Edible & Medicinal Shrubs


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

#yyj Winter Edible & Medicinal Flowering Shrubs

Butterfly Tree (Buddleia davidii)

Flowers:  March

Flowers, Leaves & Roots:  Culinary – flowers, Dye, Medicinal, Tea

Taste:  Sweet

More on Butterfly Tree


Cherry Blossoms (Prunus)

Cherry Tree in Bloom

Flowers: Early Spring however this picture was taken first week of Jan, ’18

Flowers:  Culinary, Medicinal, Cosmetic, Decoration, Tea, Jellies, Infused Vinegar, Infused Honey,  Flower Essence

Taste:  Subtle, floral

Buy Cherry Blossom Tree Seeds

More on Cherry Blossoms


Forsythia

Forsythia

Flowers:  March

Flowers:  Culinary – Flowers fresh in salads, garnish, soups, thickeners, jelly, syrups,  Medicinal, Tea, Flower Essence, Infused Honey

Taste:  Fresh & floral like they smell

 

More on Forsythia

Buy Canadian Forsythia Seeds


Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

Rosemary

Flowers:  December

Flowers & Leaves:  Culinary – seasoning, garnish,  Medicinal, Tincture, Tea, Infused Vinegar, Infused Honey, Flower Essence

Taste:  Strong aroma & taste, spicy

 

 More on Rosemary


More on #yyj Winter:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000