#Homemade Dish-soap

by Renee Lindstrom,GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Homemade dish-soap suds

Experimenting  on ways to create homemade dish-soap has finally led to a recipe that works well and that I enjoy.  This particular recipe creates the suds I want to have and does a splendid job of cleaning the dishes of all oils and residues.  This is important for cleaning  the jars that end up in the sink everyday from fermented foods and drinks!  This is the first dish soap that makes cleaning up after dough easy.

There are three main ingredients in this recipe:

  • Water – 1/4 cup
  • Castile Soap – 1 cup
  • Veggie Glycerin – 2 tablespoons
  • Optional:  Essential Oil 10 drops

Due to seasonal sinus stuffiness I added a few drops of Eucalyptus Essential Oil drops.

The Glycerin is available in liquid or solid form.  I have a solid form so a small amount was cut to melt over low heat.  Once melted into a liquid the other ingredients where added and mixed.  The last step was to pour this liquid soap into it’s own container until it was time to use it.

In the Greater Victoria Community drop into Borden Mercantile located at 3960 Borden Street to find lanolin and glycerin.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

Making Cottage Cheese @ Home

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Enjoying home-made cottage cheese curds, fermented salsa and pickled cucumber from home-made apple cider vinegar

Getting the knack of creating yogurt from a carton of milk it was time to explore making cottage cheese.  Discovered it is as easy to make as yogurt and as enjoyable to eat knowing exactly how it was made with no added expense on the pocket-book.  It can be flavoured with spices from the cupboard and herbs and edibles from the garden.  The most rewarding it that food has become fun and most importantly, rewarding!  Gone is the inconvenience of eating.

The simple recipe I follow is:

Ingredients

  • 1 gal of Milk
  • Small amount of cream, milk, sour cream or kefir to moisten
  • 3/4 cups Home made Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Flavouring:  Herbs, spices, garden edibles

Equipment:

  • Pot
  • Thermometer
  • Cheesecloth , cotton or strainer
  • Bowl

Bring milk to 180 Degrees Fahrenheit and slowly add apple cider vinegar.  Milk will curd immediately.  Let sit for 10 minutes before straining curds to separate from whey.  Put into bowl to cool and then add spices, herbs and use dry curds or moisten with cream, sour cream, kefir or milk.   Use whey in smoothies, other recipes or use to water your houseplants!

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Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Refreshing Black Bean & Cilantro Salad

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Black Bean & Cilantro Salad

3rd & 1st Chakras (Solar Plexus & Root Chakras)

This is an easy and healthy salad that can be a main dish or goes well  with other dishes.  I love eating it over quinoa and add salsa to compliment it.

Salad Ingredients:

  • 1 can  or 1 cup home-made Black Beans 
  • 1 cup freshly peeled, frozen, canned Corn 
  • 1/4 cup diced red or Green Pepper
  • 1/4 cup diced Tomato
  • 1/4 cup diced Cucumber
  • 1/4 cup diced Celery
  • Fresh Green Leaves (Spinach shown in picture)
  • 1/4 cup minced Cilantro 
  • 1/2 cup Crumbled Feta Cheese 
  • Handful Fresh Bean Sprouts 
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

Dressing Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons Oil
  • Crushed Garlic Cloves (to taste)
  • 1 tablespoon Vinegar
  • Minced Parsley
  • Salt & Pepper to taste

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Cooking with Lesser Celandine

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Lesser Celandine

 

This little plant has been labeled an invasive in #yyj’s Greater Victoria Communities.  I imagine that it isn’t well-known as a culinary, medical and cosmetic herb.  I found that it was very much like eating spinach after trying out some ways of cooking with this tenacious plant.  I had read some old recipes and interested in giving it a go.  There was no taste eating the raw leaves, however that changed after steaming.  Frying the stems and bulb-lets and eating with olive oil was tasty and easy to make.

Here are some old recipes:

  • The small bulb-lets of the root are cooked for a few minutes in boiling water and served with olive oil and course sea salt.
  • The leaves are boiled and eaten as a vegetable.
  • The bulb-lets and tubers can be fried, boiled, or roasted.

The leaves are best eaten before they go into flower.  Once they flower the juice is too strong and can become toxic.

Read more on Lesser Celandine 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

OMG best Spring Green Soup ever using ‘Hairy Bittercress & more’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

by Renee Lindstrom

Bittercress Soup

Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)

In a hurry before class I ran out and gathered some of these weeds that I had noticed growing in the pathway.  Easy to pull and clean in the wetness of recent winter rains.  Pulling the rosettes from the roots and adding them  to veggie stock to leaving cooking for a couple of minutes was easy.  Once soft and wilted into the blender to mince up greens before pouring into a bowl.  Tasting this soup I have to admit that  this was the best soup ever!  It is tasty and nutritious and took less than 10 minutes from start to finish!  It would go well with a spoon of yogurt or sour cream added before serving.

Ingredients

  • Hand full of Hairy Bittercress rosettes
  • Two cups of veggie broth liquid
  • Salt & pepper to taste

Add freshly picked and wash rosettes to veggie broth, add salt and pepper,  and then bring to boil.  Boil until Bittercress is wilted and soft in the liquid and pour into blender.  Mix and serve.  Add garnish and enjoy.

Optional additions to enhance flavour and goodness:

  • Baby Swisschard & Kale
  • Chickweed
  • Wild Onions or Garlic

Optional spicy and tasty garnish:

  • Calendula Flowers
  • Borage Fowers
  • Forget-me-not Flowers

 

More on Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Chickweed Pesto

by Renee Lindstrom

Fresh Chickweed

Chickweed pesto is delicious, fresh and nutritious!  Pick fresh from your garden or area that you know has not been sprayed.  If you are picking in public area be sure to wash it in a vinegar bath to be on the safe side.

Ingredients:

1/2 cup olive oil
1 cup of fresh chopped chickweed
2 cloves garlic
1/4 Pine nuts
Salt and pepper (try fresh ground)
2 tbsp Parmesan cheese

Chop your chickweed first before adding into the blender with other ingredients.  Blend together and enjoy!  Chickweed pesto can be used in the same ways you would use traditional pesto made with basil.  Try over noodles, dipping sauce or with eggs or sandwich spread.

 

More on Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Chickweed Medicine


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Winter #yyj Wild Salad from the Garden

by Renee Lindstrom,  , GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

When the greens start emerging it is time to begin finding novel ways to include them into your diet.  One great way is to start adding these greens and flowers to your salads.  They pair well with Winter veggies that you may have growing like lettuce, kale, spinach and swiss-chard.  Other veggies could be beets and slivers of red onion.

 

 

January’s Wild Greens from the garden

  • Wild Fennel Self-Starters
  • Hairy Bittercress
  • Chickweed
  • Dandelion Greens
  • Wild Garlic Onions
  • Delicate Rosemary Flowers

In February add

  • Butterbur Flowers

In March the choices grow

  • Butter Fly Tree Flowers
  • Cleavers
  • English Daisy Flowers & Leaves
  • Dandelion Flowers
  • Forsythia Flowers
  • Hens n’ chicks
  • Polyanthus Flowers
  • Purple Dead Nettle
  • Wild Violets

Cut and toss, add whole flowers or flower petals and add a simple & subtle dressing:

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons of  wine vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard
  • pinch of salt

Toss and enjoy!


Recommended Reading:

The Best Dressed Salad World Famous Salads Dressings & Their Origins by Author Jim Long


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000