Lilac Wine Vinegar made easily!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

by Renee Lindstrom

Lilac Wine Vinegar

Making flavoured vinegar’s are simple and easy.  The most time consuming part is picking your flowers, rinsing them and letting them dry and wilt before processing them!

Once the lilacs are wilted pick some small stems and place in your jar.  In this case I used small gift bottles, however, I usually use a large mason jar and recant after the infusion has set for some time.  In these gift bottles I placed only a few bloom branches.  In a mason jar I would pack the jar 1/4 full.  While preparing the flowers I heat up wine vinegar and just before it comes to a boil pour it over the flowers and fill the jar.

Once the jar is filled the lid is put on and the mixture is left in a cool location for 4 to 6 weeks.  Each day the jar is jostled.    After infusing the large mason jar will be filtered, decanted and enjoyed!

More on Making Lilac Jelly


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Lilac Jelly

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Making Lilac Jelly is like making Fairy Jelly!  The colour is unique!
The taste even more so!  Anyone with little girls would be giving 
them a wonderful experience making this jelly for their tea parties!

It is such a simple process

Preparing the flowers in 3 easy steps

  1.  Preparing lilac flowers for jelly begins with picking stems before noon, rinsing them with a light solution of apple cider vinegar and setting them aside to dry and wilt.
  2. Later in the day set some water on to boil and pick the flowers from the stems.
  3. Once you have 2 cups of flowers picked and in a glass container cover with 3 cups of hot water and leave them to steep.   Once the infusion has cooled cover and put them in the fridge over night, (you can leave infusion in fridge for up to 48 hours).

The next day gather your ingredients together and put your jelly jars on to sterilize.

Filter the flowers from the infusion and squeeze remaining water to get as much of the infused water for the jelly as possible.

Ingredients

  • 2 – 1/4 cups of lilac steeped water
  • *2 – 3 cups of sugar
  • 1 box pectin
  • 1 tablespoon of butter

*sugar – most recipes call for double this amount of sugar, however, to add that amount would be too sweet for this writer.  Using honey to replace sugar would create a jelly that hides the taste of the lilacs.  

Recipe

Remember put jars and lids in streamer and bring to boil while preparing jelly.  

Combine infused water and pectin and bring to boil.  Slowly add sugar stirring and bringing solution back to a boil.  Add butter and melt to reduce foam and skimming process.  Take off heat and skim off remaining foam.

Take jars out of steamer and begin filling leaving only small air space!  Cover with lids and set aside to cool.  As the jars cool a popping sound will happen as the seal is made between the jar and lid.  Once cooled check lids and re-steam the jars that have not sealed!

The jelly can take up to six hours to become  solid.

Enjoy!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dandelion Flower Cookies topped with Dandelion & Honey Jelly is a taste treat

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

I have to say eating this cookie with dandelion jelly was a taste treat!  Are you willing to try it?

by Renee Lindstorm

 

Recipe:

  • 1/2 cup oil
    1/2 cup honey
    2 eggs
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 cup coconut flour
    1 cup dry kamut flakes
    1/2 cup dandelion florets

Mix together wet ingredients; oil, honey, eggs and coconut.  Mix in flour, flakes and dandelion flowers.  Bake at 350 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes.

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Dandelion Flower Tea Recipe

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

by Renee Lindstrom

Dandelion: Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Pick & Rinse 8 to 12 fresh flowers (organic & untreated)

12 oz of boiling water

Honey (optional sweetener)

Pour hot water over fresh flower and let steep for up to five minutes. 
 Filter dandelion tea infusion and sweeten to taste. 
Enjoy your tea moment!
(Imaginative memories of reading Classic - Wind & the Willows come to mind)

Why dandelion blossom tea?

  • Antibacteral
  • Source of antioxidants
  • Increases blood circulation
  • Relieve’s pain, cramps & depression (headaches, backaches, menstrual cramps)
  • Supports vision with a Compound called  helenin that is helpful for night vision and Vitamin A and Vitamin B12 good the eyes
  • Preventative for boils, skin infections, tuberculosis

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds

Buy Dried Dandelion Roots

Buy Dried Dandelion Leaves

 

Read more on Wind and the Willows by  Kenneth Grahame

Wind in the Willows

Back to  Recipes 

Back to  The Amazing Dandelion

How to Infuse Wildflower Oils


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Dandelion & Forsythia Blossom Jelly

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

 

Ingredients:

  • Four to five cups of Forsythia flowers
  • Three cups of Dandelion Flowers
  • 3 to 5 cups of Sugar or 1/2 cups to 3 cups of Honey
  • 1/2 lemon or (2 tablespoons) Lemon Juice
  • Pectin (follow directions on your package)
  • *Vanilla Bean (optional)
  • *Zest of Orange (optional)

Part one:

Cover one part dandelion to two parts forsythia flowers with boiling water.  Let sit for two hours to steep.  Put into fridge overnight and  strain flower in the morning.   You will be left with flower tea.

Next morning:

Filter with cheesecloth or coffee filter.  After straining the remaining flowers, there was 5 cups of liquid.

Bring filtered liquid to boil while adding lemon juice, pectin, optional vanilla bean and zest. At boiling point add sweeteners, reduce heat and let simmer for 30 minutes.

When liquid is thick ladle into canning jars and process as you would with your regular jellies and jams!  Enjoy the softer flower flavours.  The colours will range from light honey to dark golden.  It depends on the flowers in your region.

Learn more  about the Forsythia 

Back to  Recipes 

Back to  The Amazing Dandelion

How to Infuse Wildflower Oils


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Back Yard Salad in March!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Foraging for the day’s yard salad ingredients we found these to add to the garden parsley, swiss chard and kale that is emerging.   Bowls were overflowing and it’s only the end of March!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

First ‘Weed & Flower Salad’ of the Season

…and the start of many more……..
IMG_20170314_142901_783


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.