Cajeput (Melaleuca leucadendra)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

s @insideawareness.com

MortarEdibletea kettle

Also known as: Punk Tree; Broadleaved Paperbark, Weeping paperbark, Broadleaf Tea Tree

Uses:  Culinary, Detergents, Medicinal, Perfume, Repellent, Topical Skin Products, Sleep Aid

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Twigs

Preparation:  Tinctures, Tonic, Flower Essence, Skin Care, Soap-making, Lotions, Ointments, Toothpaste

Melaleuca leucadendra Linn., Plate 15 from “Forest Flora of New South Wales” by w:Joseph Henry Maiden (1859–1925) – wikimedia commons

  • Symbolizes: Unity & Strength
  • Element:  Ether & Space
  • Governed by:  Venus, 5th Chakra

The origin of the name Cajeput means “the sunny side of the mountain.”  It is related to tea tree Melaleuca alternifolia, with a similar but stronger camphorous aroma. It is used in Tiger Balm and in the decongestant Olbas Oil.

Properties:

  • general antiseptic
  • anti-infective
  • antiputrefactive
  • decongestioning
  • anticatarrhal
  • expectorant
  • neuralgic
  • antispasmodic agent

Culinary

Fruits and leaves of Cajeput can be used for infusing into a tea.  Oils from this tree can be used for flavouring baked goods, candies, and relishes.

Health & Wellness

Cajeput promotes circulation, reduces fevers and relieves cramps. Its herbal uses for internal use are to treat bronchitis, colds, gastric infections, headaches, roundworms, sinusitis, toothache, tuberculosis,and tumors; to loosen phlegm and as a tonic. Externally an oil of Cajeput can be applied to the skin for rheumatism, gout, neuralgia, acne, nasal congestion, sinusitis, toothache, chilblains, mites (scabies) and a fungal infection of the skin (tinea versicolor).  It is used in commercial preparations for bacterial and fungal infections in fish.

Buy Cajeput Seeds – Product # S1593


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Sprouting Camellia Sinensis (Tea Leaves)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Camellia Sinensis (Tea Leaves) inside Table Top Greenhouse

 

I hope you can see the little round balls on black landscaping paper inside this Table Top Greenhouse.  These are Camellia Sinensis that I hope to start and grow in #yyjs Greater Victoria area.  As I mentioned in post about starting Moringa Seeds, it was one of small trees I had hoped to focus on this year.

The first attempt of soaking and sprouting these seeds did not result in germination.  Inspired by the success of  germination in the second attempt at the Moringa Seeds here is another attempt with these Tea Plant seeds.

 

These seeds soaked for 24 hours and I did notice that some seeds sunk and others stayed floating.  I have read research that suggests the seeds that do not sink are not healthy or the pods are empty.  Others suggest they have started seedlings with the floaters.   In the first round I soaked the seeds and cracked the shells open.  Now  I have just come across someone who places their seeds in the sun for a few days to crack open.  This releases an agent that is in the shell to stop the seed from germinating.  I came across this with Kiwi Fruit!  They too have a substance around the seeds to stop them from sprouting that has to be removed.

So this is where the experiment rests for now while the sun does its part.  I expect to plant the seeds as soon as they crack and put aside for at least a month before noticing any sprouts.  Fingers crossed!  Stay tuned.

Follow Camellia Sinensis Adventures on TwitterInstagram or Facebook


 

Recommended Reading:

“Hello little Moringa Sprouts”

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

They are so tiny you may not see them in the pictures.  I feel like a new mom!  In an earlier post on Moringa Seeds and Leaves I mentioned how last winter I was given seeds and no matter how I tried they would not sprout.  I had two trees that I wanted to focus my attention on this year; the Moringa and the Camellia Sinensis (Tea Leaves).  I tried all different ways to get these seeds to sprout.  The Camellia Sinensis  could take 6 weeks or longer to sprout which is a long time to wait for nothing to happen.  Talk about watching a pot!

The year is not over yet and round two.  Noticing that the Moringa Sprouted this time around diminishes my disappointment experienced from the first attempt.  Not a loss of effort though as I think I have more understanding of the seeds.  Something had to have been gained by all the focus, right?

Once again I soaked the seeds in two ways.  One with shell on and one with shell peeled.  I began  with shells on and soaked them for 24 hours before planting them in sand.  I used small boxes of sand and just submerged them.  They were then placed in a small, and I mean small, tabletop green house in the hottest sun #yyj has received this year.  That was not my intention and I worried that they would bake in there.  Upon taking them out and digging one or two up I noticed they had sprouted.  Hallelujah.  This took about 10 days.

Mini Table Top Greenhouse

Watching these pots and not seeing any upward sprouting I decided to peel the shells on some more seeds and soak them.  After 24 hours these have been placed in the tabletop greenhouse and are now resting in sand.  I am curious to see if these sprout too.

For me it is exciting to observe these plants and learn more about them.  I hope to experience them grow tall enough to grow their infamous pea pods that are so abundant and nutritious that they are being naturalized in countries that lack both of these; food and nutrition.  It is my experience that with increased nutrition there is decreased addiction.  Could this be an angle to focus on with support in our own community?  I would like to explore this as a new table vegetable for myself as well.

Stay tuned, my living room may be full of Moringa Trees this winter.  Maybe I have to dream in a shared greenhouse that someone is not using?

Read more on the benefits of Moringa 

Follow Moringa Adventures on TwitterInstagram or Facebook


Recommended Moringa Product Ideas:

Moringa Tree Benefits

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Moringa Seeds

Moringa (Moringa Oleifera)

The Moringa Tree is another one of those ancient natural sources of food, nutrition and medicine that has gained popularity as more of us worldwide become aware of it.    It is still used for a cure or prevention of about 300 different ailments in Ayurveda.

This tree grows like a weed in the right climates and with so many beneficial uses it is called a miracle tree.    It originates from the southern foothills of the Himalayas.  It is drought resistant and proven to be good food source so it is being naturalized into the warm areas experiencing food shortages like Malawi, Senegal, and India.  In an earlier post called,  Moringa Seeds & Leaves, a focus was on water purification.  The  Seeds from this tree can purify water when they are crushed making this tree valuable to these countries.

Moringa has antibiotic and antibacterial properties,  and is anti-inflammatory.  It is being explored for edema, suppressing cancer cells, digestion and weight-loss, aging, its anti-diabetic characteristics, ability for lowering cholesterol, and cardio-protective properties.

Moringa Leaves & Seed Pods

The Moringa leaves and seed pods are a source of protein, calcium, beta carotene, vitamin’s A, B1 (thiamine) B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B-6 and and C, folate acid, iron, magnesium,
phosphorus, zinc, potassium, chlorogenic acid and niazimicin.

The leaves are a good source of antioxidants, beta-carotene, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid.  I have read that 100 grams of dry moringa leaf contain:  9 times the protein of yogurt, 10 times the vitamin A of carrots, 15 times the potassium of bananas, 17 times the calcium of milk, 12 times the vitamin C of oranges.

Read more on Moringa Seeds & Leaves

Follow Moringa Adventures on TwitterInstagram or Facebook


Recommended Moringa Product Ideas:

Recommended Reading:


Traditional uses and properties of Moringa is based upon historical and current information available.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Privet ( ligustrum lucidum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:

tea kettleDyeMortar

2017-08-30 14.40.02

Also known as:

Uses: Medicinal Remedies, Dye, Tea

Parts Used:  Berries, Flowers, Leaves, Bark

Preparation:  Tea, Vinegar, Oil, Tincture, Infusion, Flower Essence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Symbolizes:   Healing old wounds, letting go of blocks
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Mildness, Prohibitive
  • Associated with:  Sacral Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by: Moon

Part of the olive family (Oleaceae)

I planted what I thought was a small shrub five years ago that was gifted to us. With no identifying information to go along with I was surprised after two years when it began stretching, spreading and growing taller.  It is now 10 feet high and getting wider.  According to different sources of information could grow from 15 to 30 feet high.  The is the evergreen that many topiary cuttings are created with and it is popular for use in Bonsai.  It flowered for the first time two years ago and this year there are many fruits developing as we enter into fall.  The flowers are a nice fragrance to begin with but slowly they become less attractive over the days as the blooms diminish.  This year this Privet is gifting us with an abundance of fruit that are forming from the spent flowers.  When the fruits are ripe in the fall, these are the main part of this plant used in Traditional Chinese and Herbal Remedies.  The leaves, flowers and bark can also used.  You will find the dried berries ground up in many medicinal and beauty products!

Nutrients & Qualities: 

Privet has applications as a  diuretic, astringent, antiseptic, immuno-stimulant, anti-cholestrolemic and it has anti-cancer properties.  It is known to invigorate the immune system.

  • Constituents:
    • quercetin glycosides;  flavonol glycosides, secoiridoids (oleuropein, ligustaloside A, ligustaloside B, and ligstroside)
    • kaempferol glycosides
    • polyphenols
    • oleanolic
    • palmitic
    • linoleic
    • ursolic acids
    • mannitol
    • glucose
    • starch
    • bitter resin
    • bitter extractive
    • albumen
    • salts
    • ligustrin

Therapeutic Uses:

  • Flowers:
    • Headaches
    • Vaginal Irritations
    • Menstrual Problems
  • Leaves:
    • Diarrhea
    • Bladder disorders
    • Stomach ulcers
    • Indigestion
    • Increase appetite
    • Sore throat & eyes
    • Ulcers
    • Swellings
    • Mumps
    • Chapped lips
    • Throat cancer
  • Leaves & bark: 
    • Headaches
    • Tumours
    • Bronchitis
    • Coughs
    • Light-headedness
    • Chronic bowel problems
    • Vaginal douche
    • Mouthwash or gargle
    • Wash for skin problems
  • Berries/Seeds:
    • Liver & Kidney ailments
    • Increase energy
    • Menopause
    • Insomnia
    • Premature aging
    • Grey hair
    • Heart palpitations
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Tinnitus (a ringing in the ear)
    • Backache
    • Eye issues including cataracts, glaucoma & cataract
    • Contagious ailments: hepatitis B & sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
    • High blood pressure (hypertension)
    • Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia (a fungal infection of the lungs)
    • Respiratory problems

How to use Leaves & Bark:

Boil 1 tsp. leaves or bark in 1 cup water. Take 1 to 2 cups a day.


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy
    • on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

Making Natural Plant Dye using Buddleia davidii

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

 

Commonly called the Butterfly Bush in our #yyj region, the plant parts of the Buddleia davidii can be used to create deep shades of yellow dye for paper, wool and fabrics.  In the above photo I chose to dye 2 pieces of cotton fabric using different parts of this trees plant material. The fabric on the left is a dye made from the flowers of this tree and the fabric on the right is created from the branches and leaves.  The deeper color on the left reminds me of the vibrant colors often worn by Tibetan Buddhist Monks.

Creating plant dye naturally is fun, simple, educational and easy.  I wish they would engage kids in our classrooms in their art or science classes!  

The steps to  create the dye – you can substitute other flowers, leaves, stems and roots!  

  1. I began by picking diminishing flowers from a friends tree remembering to  cut higher up the branch to get limbs and leaves.
  2. Separating them into two batches and putting them into two large pots.  The flowers in one and the leaves and limbs in another.
  3. Filling the pots with water completely covering the plant materials and heated to a boil.  Once boiling turned down to simmer for 20 minutes and then left to sit overnight.
  4. The plant materials where then strained out leaving the liquid to infuse the material.

The dye bath created from the flowers was thicker and much deeper in color than the bath created from the leaves and limbs.

Here are some samples of the dye bath water at intervals.:  The first picture was taken immediately after adding water to the pot and covering the materials.  Each of the next photos were taken as the water came to a boil at 5 to 10 minute intervals.

 

 


The material was added to the natural dye water and brought up to a boil on the *stove and reduced to simmer for 10 to 15 minutes.  This was then left to sit for a number of hours (overnight).  You can leave this to sit longer.  I have left dye infusions to sit for a few days to obtain a solid colour.

*I have begun to explore with solar energy to dye by placing a glass jar of water, plant parts and material in the sun to heat and sit infusing!  Wouldn’t this be interesting for children?

More on:


 

Butter Fly Bush (Buddleia davidii)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP –  – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

 

 

 

 

 

In Chinese Herbology it is known as the ‘eye guardian’

  • Symbolizes:  Transformation, rebirth, build charisma & activate power of attraction
  • Uses:  Edible, Dye, Tea, Medicinal, Tincture, Flower Essence, Eye Wash
  • Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots
  • Preparation:  Flower Tea, Flower Essence, Add to Rice to improve or dye it yellow, syrups

Associated with:  Brow Chakra

In our region of  Greater Victoria, #yyj, the beautiful flowering Butterfly Tree has recently been labelled as invasive.   Each tree is covered with flowers from July to September and if the blossoms are left to go to seed,  they spread and sprout easily in our growing conditions.  The new growth has spread at a rate that the new trees are endangering our native species.

The above pictured Butterfly Tree is one I rescued from a culvert before I learned it was labelled invasive.  It was less than a foot high and in the second year I accidentally cut the top off when pruning.  I thought that would be the end of it however,  another branch bent over and shoots grew upright and branched out.  This tree growth is only the third year!  It is very easy to grow and now I  understand why it has been categorized as invasive.

Originally from Asia where it is used medicinally for an eye and liver treatment.  It is also used to infuse in teas.  In North America it is popular for using as a natural dye and create sweet syrups.

Buy Heirloom Butterfly Bush Seeds 

#yyj Non-Native Winter Flowering Edible & Medicinal Shrubs


Read more from Living in Natures’ Love on 

 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Birch Tree

by Renee Lindstrom

Betulaceae Family

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This Birch Tree is my first indicator of the changing seasons.  This past year a male Robin used this tree to sit and share his mating call starting in March and not ending until June.   This little Robin’s song brought me into a deeper focus of this tree and initiated research on the possible benefits and uses of birch.

Birch trees grow near water and they are a tree that is the first to appear in toxic soils.  It is known for cleaning toxicity out of and area allowing for second growth of other species to grow and survive.  A street in our neighborhood has an underground creek that travels through it towards the ocean and Birch trees line the streets along this water way making it easy to gather bark, leaves, buds and twigs.   Some of these Birch Trees look as though they could be strong and healthy however they are scared by human behaviors.  Cuttings into the tree and poor limb removal.  If I where to asses this street for a client I would have them consider the significance of the appearance of these trees.  It would represent the relationships in the area.

Pictured below are the leaves, buds and twigs picked, from the tree that hangs over my fence and looks pristine, to dry for tea’s, tinctures and infused oils.

Birch

White Birch, Twigs, Buds & Leaves

There is also a mushroom that grows mostly on Birch Trees that can be gathered for it’s medicinal benefits.  This mushroom is called a Chaga Mushroom and it is commonly made into tea.  A Chaga Mushroom does not have the usual characteristics of mushrooms.  It’s appearance is more like a growth.  This fungus is pictures below:

birch-250363_960_720

chaga-on-birch

 


Creative uses of Birch Tree Parts

Some of the ways I have been integrating White Birch into my lifestyle is through creating:

  • Flavoured Vinegar
  • Flavoured Water
  • Oil Infusions
  • Water Infusions for Bathing and Hair Rinse
  • Syrup
  • Teas
  • Tinctures

Research

In researching the qualities of the different parts of the Birch Tree I have read that it has properties that stimulates the digestive system, aids in better digestion and is effective in strengthening the bones and boosting overall immunity. These trees contain Betulin which can be turned into Betulinic acid, however Betulinic acid also exists in Birch Bark naturally.  Betulin is ant-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral and a cell regenerative and contains astringent, laxative, and diuretic properties.  Betulinic acid is currently being researched as treatments for the herpes viruses, for AIDS, skin cancer and brain tumors.  The herpes viruses cause cold sores, genital infections, chickenpox, shingles, infectious mononucleosis, and are thought to play a role in multiple sclerosis and Karposi’s sarcoma.

It has been suggested that the Birch Tree properties help in eliminating cellulite from the body and treats problems like obesity over time.

dsc_07822017-02-19-15-45-46

The sap from the birch tree contains vitamins; C and B, minerals, glucose and fructose.  The sap is rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, phosphorous, iron, sodium, and amino acids.

The buds of the Birch Tree are a rich source of vitamin C, tannin, and flavonoids, and there are articles that suggest they are effective in the prevention of viral infections and even the formation of cancer. They also help increase urination and help in flushing out toxins, uric acid, and excess water from the body maintaining good kidney and liver health.

The leaves and twigs of the Birch Tree  can be used in treating inflammations and infections of the urinary tract, arthritis, high cholesterol, heart and kidney edema, cystitis and skin conditions like eczema, dermatitis and other skin irritations. They can be used to strengthen hair roots and as a dandruff treatment.

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Birch Bark is like a strong paper material that lasts forever, even after the rest of it’s tree has long returned to the soil the bark remains.  For this reason Birch Bark is being studied for anti aging properties.  It is also a focus in cancer research.  Taken internally Birch Bark  aids in purification of the blood, conditions of diarrhea, canker sores in the mouth and to expels worms.  Birch Bark  has anti-inflammatory qualities so can be applied externally for joint and muscle pain.   I  make tea and water infusion of Birch Bark to take internally and to use as a wash.

Chaga Mushroom  (Inonotus obliquus)

The Chaga Mushroom pictured above is a fungus that  grows on the bark of  hardwood trees like Birch and Beech Tree.  Chaga is  often made into  tea and is considered a coffee substitute. It is unusual in the mushroom world as it resembles porous wood and is black and hard – similar to lumpy charcoal.

The variety that is found on birch is believed to be the most potent medicinally because of its high concentration of betulinic acid which is toxic to cancer cells. To find out more on the medicinal benefits of Chaga read  or download pdf – Healing Powers of Chaga

I have read that Chaga (King of Medicinal Mushrooms)  is  higher in antioxidants foods  than acai, pomegranates and blueberries and that it has more capacity to wipe out free radicals.  Apparently it is the most powerful  and concentrated antioxidant known on this planet and is available in capsule form.   The National Cancer Institute explains: “Antioxidants protect cells from damage caused by unstable molecules known as free radicals.”


Harvesting

Birch Tree Leaves, Buds, Twigs & Bark

I pick Birch Tree leaves, buds and twigs in late spring, early summer when they are light green and before the bud begins to turn to seed.  The Birch Bark is harvested when the sap starts running before the leaves form.

Chaga Mushroom

In Fall and Winter before sap starts running.


Birch Tree Leaves, Buds, Twigs and Bark Uses

Birch Tree Oil

I am interested in Birch Oil for its potential in these areas:

  • Cellulite
  • Detoxing massage
  • Aching muscles
  • Rheumatism
  • Eczema
  • Psoriasis

For making Birch Tree Oil visit Creating Wildflower Oils or Birch Tree Tinctures vist Creating Wildflower Tinctures

Birch Tree Sap

I am interested in Birch Sap for the use as a cleansing tonic and for creating a natuarl syrup.

Birch Tree Tea

  • Spring cleanse
  • Kidney stones
  • Urinary gravel
  • Cystitis
  • Gout
  • Arthritis
  • Rheumatism
  • Psoriasis
  • Eczema
  • Fluid retention
  • Fevers

Simple Tea Recipe

 4/ 5 leaves per cup of boiling water

infuse for 5 to 10 minutes

Drink 3 to 4 cups a day

Read more about making your own wild teas @ Creating Wild & Sometimes Tame Flower, Leaf and Root Tea’s


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Forsythia Bush (Forsythia intermedia)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

tea kettleMortarEdible

Also known as:  ‘Golden Bell’

Uses:  Culinary, Medicinal, Cosmetics

Parts used:  Seeds, Flower, Leaves, Twigs & Roots

Preparation:   Teas, Extract, Essential Oil, Flower Essences, Juice, Syrups, Dedoctions, Poultices


  • Symbolizes:   Transformation
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Anticipation
  • Associated with:  Crown Chakra
  • Element:  Air
  • Governed by:  Sun

When Forsythia blooms on bare branches in early spring it is stunning.  One of the earliest spring bloomers with yellow flowers grouped in clusters.  Each flower has four lobes. The bark is yellowish brown in colour and has raised lenticels (bumps).  It is a fast grow bush and can grow from one to two feet per year to height of 3 meters (10’) tall and 3.5 meters (12’) wide. They can be grown as hedgerows or ornamental’s and they enjoy full sun to partial shade.

Easy Starters – Cut branch and insert in moist soil!

Culinary

The flowers are edible and  can be steams or used to make jelly and syrups.  They can be used fresh or dried for making tea.

Learn more about Forsythia & Dandelion Jelly


Health and Wellness

Seed Pods called Fruit in Chinese Traditional Medicine

After flowering this bushes forms fruit (seed pods)  that are used in Chinese Herbal formulas for treating the common cold, influenza, and allergies.  There are two stages that they pick and use these seed pods.  One stage is when the pods are unripe and green and the other, ripe and  yellow.

In Chinese Traditional Medicine these seeds are a detoxicant for treating toxic and hot conditions like inflammatory and infectious diseases as it clears the body of toxic heat (sore throats, swollen lymph glands, flues, fever and, chills. .  This includes viral and bacterial infections such as; colds, bronchitis, strep throat.  They use it to  give relief to carbuncles (staph abscesses that go deeper and get larger than boils) and more:

  • a diuretic
  • stimulant for blood flow in the pelvic area and uterus
  • reduce fever
  • expel intestinal worms
  • a skin tonic  for chronic skin eruptions, acne or dermatitis and antiscrofulous (Scrofula is a tuberculous infection of the skin on the neck).
  • prevent vomiting
  • protect liver from damage

In Western Cultures, extracts of forsythia fruit has become one common ingredient in many plant based skin-care products and is now used in cosmetic products, hair care (e.g., hair growth liniments and anti-dandruff shampoos), skin care (e.g., acne cream) and foot care (e.g., athlete’s foot) products for their antimicrobial and traditional detoxifying properties.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

 

Gingko

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

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Gingko biloba
Family:  Ginkgoaceae (ginkgo)

The Gingko biloba is native to China and is 350 million years old!  From the Jurassic period, it is not surprising, it is considered a symbol of longevity.  The International Union for Conservation of Nature has listed it as endangered.

The leaves contain ginkgolides, which are used to improve blood circulation to the brain and to relieve Alzheimer’s, Tinnitus and Reynaud’s Syndrome.  In traditional Chinese medicine the nuts of Ginkgo were widely used to treat asthma and polyuria (frequent urination).

Ginkgo has antioxidant compounds that can be used in skin care for anti-aging.   Suggested uses is for facial oil and eye cream.  It is also a natural skin cleanser.

Energies of the herb: Restoring, decongestant, relaxing, raising, diluting, astringent.

Leaves

The Gingko leaves can be consumed fresh, made into teas or dried.  Some research suggests you get the most benefit from leaves that are just turning golden in the fall, just before they fall off the tree.

Nuts

The ripening of the fruit is foul smelling, however it is after the fruit if ripen that the nut inside is gathered.  The nuts can be roasted.


Cautions to using Ginkgo

Ginkgo is a medium-strength herb where some toxicity can accumulate. After about 2 months, a person should get off the herb for awhile. Otherwise, it can accumulate and cause side effects such as dizziness, headache, fatigue, gastric or chest discomfort, loss of appetite, constipation or diarrhea.

Those with symptoms of circulatory problems or strokes must avoid it.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.