Horsetail

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP  This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Mortartea kettleEdibleDye

by Renee Lindstrom

Horsetail

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)

Horsetail is edible when it first emerges from the soil before leaves sprout on stalk. After the stalk darkens in colour and starts to have leaf shoots from the circular ribs it is no longer edible yet becomes medicinal!

As horsetail absorbs the minerals from the soil surrounding it you want to ensure that the water or soil it is growing in or near is organic and not polluted.

Nutrients & Qualities in Horsetail:

Horsetail has manganese, calcium, iron, flavonoids, caffeic acid esters, saponins, tannins, alkaloids, fatty acids, phytosterols, glycosides, phenolic acids, aconitic acid, *equisetic acid and silica.

*Equisetic acid which is a heart and nerve sedative. If taken in abnormally high doses can be poisonous.

Medicinal Qualities & Uses:

  • anti-aging,
  • anti-wrinkle,
  • anti-inflammatory,
  • antibacterial,
  • antimicrobial,
  • antioxidant,
  • coagulant,
  • demulcent,
  • diuretic,
  • astringent
  • anemia,
  • arthritis, brittle bone,
  • eyes,
    • conjunctivitis,
  •  hair,
    • hair loss
  • skin
    • acne
    • anti-aging
    • anti-wrinkle
    • burns
    • rashes
  • teeth,
  • nails,
  • gingivitis,
  • tonsillitis,
  • rheumatic disorders,
  • osteoarthritis,
  • diabetes,
  • wounds,
  • frostbite,
  • chilblains,
  • athlete’s foot,
  • boils,
  • carbuncles,
  • ulcers,
  • fistulas,
  • herpes simplex,
  • dyspepsia (impaired digestion),
  • gastrointestinal conditions,
  • cardiovascular diseases,
  • respiratory tract infections,
  • bronchitis,
  • fever,
  • malaria,
  • bladder problems,
  • urinary tract infection,
  • bed wetting,
  • kidney stones,
  • prostate problems,
  • hemorrhoids,
  • muscle cramps,
  • tumors,
  • broken bones,
  • fractures,
  • sprains,
  • nose bleed,
  • immune system

How to use:

The above ground parts of Horsetail are used and can be in dried or liquid form.  It needs to be cooked, dried, boiled or infused.  It cannot be eaten raw.

by Renee Lindstrom

Dried Horsetail

  • Drying Horsetail for Tea/Water Infusions:

Horsetail stalk and leaves can be picked, rinsed and dried.  When it dried it should remain green.  Do not use if it turns brown.

  • Horsetail Tea – max. 3 cups per day

Add 1 – 2 Teaspoons of dried or fresh Horsetail to boiling water and steep for 7 to 10 minutes.

  • Sore Throats, Coughs, Colds and Lungs

Horsetail tea can be soothing to use as a gargle for sore throats and beneficial to clear airways when breathing in its steam while boiling this herb.

  • Poultice

Crush fresh Horsetail and soak in hot water for a few minutes or soak dried horsetail in hot water, drain and place in cheesecloth to apply to area.  Leave for up to 15 minutes a few times a day.

  • Toner

Steep 1  teaspoon of Horsetail to 1 cup of boil water and steep for up to 10 minutes. When cool use cotton ball to dampen with tea solution and dab facial skin and neck to rinse in the morning and evening after removing makeup.

  • Hair Rinse or Bath Infusion

Use up to 10 teaspoons of fresh or dried horsetail to 4 cups of hot water and add to your bath or use to rinse your hair.

  • Oils, Creams & Salves

Fresh or dried Horsetail can be processed into oils and combined with other oils, plants and herbs to make salves and creams.  Find recipes here

If you don’t have a source of Fresh Horsetail find dried on-line here.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Sage

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

sage

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

Sage is a herb that is used to flavour recipes, a medicinal, a natural dye for fabric and restoring a darker color for graying hair, smudging and to ward off evil.  It is also a stinky plant to deer!

The recommended active life of a sage plant is two maybe three years, however, I have one that has traveled with me for over six years.  It is the one that I go to for adding sage to Christmas stuffing’s.  It is a tradition.  It is also the one that I have set an intention for protection in the placement of the pot in relationship to my front doors!

Constituents of Sage

Sage leaves contain tannins, estrogen, phenol acids, flavenoids, resin, saponins, silica, thujone and volatile oil.

Medicinal Uses of Sage

The medicinal use of sage are as an antibacterial, antihydrotic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiviral, aphrodisiac, astringent, carminative, stimulant, styptic, and tonic. 

  • Bacterial and Viral Conditions
  • Cardiovascular
  • Cold Sores
  • Gargle for: laryngitis, sore throat, tonsillitis, ulcerated throat, inflammation of tooth pulp, loose and bleeding teeth, preventing excessive flow of saliva, ulcerated or receding gums, ulcerated gums and mouth
  • Gastrointestinal Conditions
  • Glandular Conditions
  • Liver conditons
  • Menopausal sweating & hot flash’s
  • Mouth Sores
  • Regulates the menstrual cycle
  • Reduces perspiration
  • Salves & Washes for;  dandruff, insect bites, itchy skin, skin eruptions, treating sores, stop bleeding in all cuts
  • Sore Throats
  • Tooth Powder

Sage is used in Cosmetics and as a Hair Dye

Read more on Edible, Medicinal, Tea and Dye Flowers, Weeds & Plants


  • antibacterial –  destroys bacteria,  bactericide
  • antihydrotic  – reduces  perspiration
  • antiseptic – inhibits growth of microorganism and destroys pathogenic or putrefactive bacteria
  • antispasmodic – relieves spasms or cramps
  • antiviral – destroys viruses
  • aphrodisiac – arousing or increasing sexual desire or potency
  • astringent  – contracts organic tissue, reducing secretions or discharges
  • carminative  – eases pains, colic and expells gas from the intestines
  • stimulant – quickens the functional activity of the tissues giving more energy
  • styptic – stops bleeding by contracting the blood vessels
  • tonic – tones, strengthens and invigorates organs or the entire organism giving a feeling of well-being

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Bamboo

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

 

In 2012 my son and I received an offer to come by a clients and dig up some bamboo that was invading their driveway.  After planting it the shoots all died back and I wondered if bamboo would ever grow.  For two years it sat idle and it wasn’t until the third season it began to grow.  It grew quickly and by the fourth it was filling in the spaces between plants. Now it is hardy with a steady growth of new stocks and leaves. It is strong and flexible.

Bamboo is the a fast growing woody plant that is considered a grass in the true grass family Poaceae.  This family has over 10,000 species native to Asia and imported to North America as a decorative plant for landscaping.

Making Tea with Bamboo Leaves

There are a number of different types of bamboo leaves used for commercial  tea processing.  The Indocalamus Longiauritu pictured above is the bamboo that I have growing in my garden.

I have discovered the leaves of the Indocalamus Longiauritu were in a Chinese scientific study that suggests it has comparable components, biological activity and effective qualities to ginkgo leaves. The extract of the leaves was shown to have excellent resistance to radical, anti-oxidation, anti-aging, lowering of blood lipid and micro-circulation of blood cholesterol, dilated capillaries, clearing up, activation of the brain and memory, improve sleep, fight cancer, and had an effect of  beautifying the skin.

These bamboo leaves contain a lot of flavone and lactone, chlorophyll, amino acids, polysaccharides, vitamins, trace elements and other nutrients.  Active ingredients found are flavonoids compounds, biologically active polysaccharides and other phenolic acid derivatives, Anthraquinone compounds, amino acids and terpene Lactone, special active peptides, manganese, zinc, selenium and other trace elements.

They found it could efficiently regulate body fat, and has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, improve immunity function.

In North America the Tea wholesalers suggest that Bamboo Leaf Tea has 10 times the amount of vegetable silica than horsetail.  Horsetail has 5-8% vegetable silica versus the bamboo plant which is made up of 70% silica.  Vegetable silica helps to fix calcium, so that the body can store more of this mineral and then use it to repair bones, collagen and other body tissues.  Silica is water-soluble and so it is highest in the tea.  If the body doesn’t use the silica it flushes it  out of the body.  Therefore drinking tea through the day is recommended.

A high silica content has shown to cut hair loss, increase growth and improve vitality.

Steps for preparing Bamboo leaves for Tea

  1. Pick new bamboo leaves
  2. Wash & drain leaves
  3. Dry fry in a pan until leaves start to turn brown

Preparing Bamboo Tea

  1. Gently bring dried bamboo leaves to a boil
  2. Reduce after a few minutes and steep to taste.

If you don’t have bamboo in your garden, get tea here:

Bamboo Leaf Tea

30 Day Bamboo Leaf Tea Challenge


Bamboo as a Medicinal

Bamboo leaves have been used in Chinese medicine for hundreds of years and in the Indian Ayurveda.  They have used  the Bamboo leaf extract and tea for detoxification of the body, to aid in digestion, in the treatment of blood diseases and inflammation, for protection against cancer and for improving sleep quality.

Bamboo is considered sweet, cooling, diuretic, febrifuge, expectorant and controls vomiting, stems bleeding and has been used for bacterial infections.


 

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Black Medic (Medicago lupulin)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

EdibleMortarcollage-1465420825401 (1)

Also known as:  Hop Clover, Yellow Trefoil or Burclover

  • Uses:  edible, medicinal, natural fertilizer
  • Parts used: leaves, roots & seeds
  • Preparation: fresh as pot herb, dry the seeds

Health & Wellness

Black Medic was introduced from Europe.  It is an edible and a medicinal weed often mistaken for clover.

It is green manure grown before the first crop is planted to add nitrogen to the soil.  It is a beneficial plant in the garden as it fertilizes nearby plants with nitrogen.

Rich in vitamins A, C, and E, young leaves and shoots can be eaten raw or cooked as a potherb. They contain about 6% protein, 0.14% fat, 9.5% carbohydrate and 1.4% ash.

The seeds can be eaten raw, dried or roasted and ground into flour when they turn black..

Black Medic has laxative qualities and has antibacterial properties against micro-organisms.

Read More on Edible, Medicinal, Dye Plants


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000