Horsetail

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP  This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Mortartea kettleEdibleDye

by Renee Lindstrom

Horsetail

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)

Horsetail is edible when it first emerges from the soil before leaves sprout on stalk. After the stalk darkens in colour and starts to have leaf shoots from the circular ribs it is no longer edible yet becomes medicinal!

As horsetail absorbs the minerals from the soil surrounding it you want to ensure that the water or soil it is growing in or near is organic and not polluted.

Nutrients & Qualities in Horsetail:

Horsetail has manganese, calcium, iron, flavonoids, caffeic acid esters, saponins, tannins, alkaloids, fatty acids, phytosterols, glycosides, phenolic acids, aconitic acid, *equisetic acid and silica.

*Equisetic acid which is a heart and nerve sedative. If taken in abnormally high doses can be poisonous.

Medicinal Qualities & Uses:

  • anti-aging,
  • anti-wrinkle,
  • anti-inflammatory,
  • antibacterial,
  • antimicrobial,
  • antioxidant,
  • coagulant,
  • demulcent,
  • diuretic,
  • astringent
  • anemia,
  • arthritis, brittle bone,
  • eyes,
    • conjunctivitis,
  •  hair,
    • hair loss
  • skin
    • acne
    • anti-aging
    • anti-wrinkle
    • burns
    • rashes
  • teeth,
  • nails,
  • gingivitis,
  • tonsillitis,
  • rheumatic disorders,
  • osteoarthritis,
  • diabetes,
  • wounds,
  • frostbite,
  • chilblains,
  • athlete’s foot,
  • boils,
  • carbuncles,
  • ulcers,
  • fistulas,
  • herpes simplex,
  • dyspepsia (impaired digestion),
  • gastrointestinal conditions,
  • cardiovascular diseases,
  • respiratory tract infections,
  • bronchitis,
  • fever,
  • malaria,
  • bladder problems,
  • urinary tract infection,
  • bed wetting,
  • kidney stones,
  • prostate problems,
  • hemorrhoids,
  • muscle cramps,
  • tumors,
  • broken bones,
  • fractures,
  • sprains,
  • nose bleed,
  • immune system

How to use:

The above ground parts of Horsetail are used and can be in dried or liquid form.  It needs to be cooked, dried, boiled or infused.  It cannot be eaten raw.

by Renee Lindstrom

Dried Horsetail

  • Drying Horsetail for Tea/Water Infusions:

Horsetail stalk and leaves can be picked, rinsed and dried.  When it dried it should remain green.  Do not use if it turns brown.

  • Horsetail Tea – max. 3 cups per day

Add 1 – 2 Teaspoons of dried or fresh Horsetail to boiling water and steep for 7 to 10 minutes.

  • Sore Throats, Coughs, Colds and Lungs

Horsetail tea can be soothing to use as a gargle for sore throats and beneficial to clear airways when breathing in its steam while boiling this herb.

  • Poultice

Crush fresh Horsetail and soak in hot water for a few minutes or soak dried horsetail in hot water, drain and place in cheesecloth to apply to area.  Leave for up to 15 minutes a few times a day.

  • Toner

Steep 1  teaspoon of Horsetail to 1 cup of boil water and steep for up to 10 minutes. When cool use cotton ball to dampen with tea solution and dab facial skin and neck to rinse in the morning and evening after removing makeup.

  • Hair Rinse or Bath Infusion

Use up to 10 teaspoons of fresh or dried horsetail to 4 cups of hot water and add to your bath or use to rinse your hair.

  • Oils, Creams & Salves

Fresh or dried Horsetail can be processed into oils and combined with other oils, plants and herbs to make salves and creams.  Find recipes here

If you don’t have a source of Fresh Horsetail find dried on-line here.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

The Amazing Dandelion

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Dandelion

by Renee Lidnstrom

Spring Dandelions

Uses:  Culinary, Pot Herb, Medicinal, Dye, Detox, Coffee Substitute, Love Potion, Weight Control, Anti Aging, Tonic

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves, Roots

Preparation:  Fresh, Culinary, Dried,  Flower Essences,  Infused Water, Juicing, Oil, Tea, Tincture, Vinegar

Recipes


  • Symbolizes:   Circle of Life, Hope, Dreams, Well-being and Joy
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Joy and Faithfulness
  • Associated with: Binding Love, Crown  and Solar Plexus Chakra’s
  • Element:  Air
  • Governed by:  Jupiter

Health & Wellness

Dandelions are increasing in popularity in mainstream health and fitness programs to the point of being called a super food due to the volume of goodness in each plant.  I recently discovered that the flowers are a mild pain reliever when they are infused with oil and used on joints, aches and pain.  As a Feldenkrais®Practitionerthis is good news for  many students and clients.  They would be relieved to learn more natural ways of controlling their pain.

Dandelions are a very rich source of beta-carotene and when consumed we convert this into Vitamin A. Their active ingredients are found in both the roots and leaves.  Dandelions are a good source of:

  • Vitamins: A,C, K and B-vitamins
  • Minerals: magnesium, zinc, potassium, iron, calcium and choline

Their chemical breakdown:

  • Sesquiterpene lactones (bitters): taraxinic acid (taraxacin), tetrahydroridentin B
    • Triterpenoids and sterols: taraxasterol, taraxerol, cycloartenol, beta-sitosterol
    • Other: Vitamin A, Vitamin C, tannins, alkaloids, pectin, inulin, starch, potassium, beta carotene, caffeic acid, flavonoids (apigenin)

Interesting to Know that Dandelion leaves are high in vitamin A, vitamin C and have more iron, calcium and protein than spinach!

Conditions Dandelions Have been used for and currently being researched  for:

  • Antioxidant
  • Digestive Aid
  • Inflammation
  • Immune System
  • Liver Detox and Cleanse
  • Gallbladder
  • Laxative
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Urinary disorders
  • Acne
  • Jaundice
  • Cancer
  • Anemia

How to use Dandelions

Each part of the plant is edible and can be used for creating medicinal remedies and  making tea. The flowers are used for fresh tea and the roots and leaves are mostly used as a dried herb for tea.  I have begun to dry the flower petals to use in tea. Fresh leaves and a few flower petals can be tossed into salads.

Did you know that,  you can cook the spring roots, leaves, flowers and buds or add the to a smoothie, make wine or use as a coffee substitute?

Buy Dried Dandelion Roots

Buy Dried Dandelion Leaves

Try stir frying fresh spring leaves with oil and garlic and toss the unfurled flower buds in.  As you eat the buds they pop in your mouth!  I notice that the bitterness is reduced with cooking.  In spring,  the roots also are soft and tender and can be added together with leaves into a stir fry or stewed dishes and soups.  Add flower petals to a grain dish to add colour and flavour.

Next time you weed your garden set them aside to try them in your own recipes.

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Aging Neck

Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Do you have a fascination with young people’s necks as yours ages?  I do!  It seems that I took mine for granted until it was lost!!!!!  What I notice myself doing is observing peoples necks to help determine their age.  One advantage of becoming familiar with my own, as it ages, is that it seems to give me more information to look for in what I am seeing in others.  Life!  I would rather have a smoother, tighter and less fleshy neck tissue over my voice box!

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Blue Butterfly Flower & Agar Agar infusion

So when I noticed I had some Butterfly Pea and Agar Agar thickener left over from the mornings facial experiment I saved it for bedtime to apply to my neck.  I remembered to apply it and this morning rinsed it off.  I am so happy I did!  The colour and texture of this part of my neck has changed.  The  excess flesh of weight loss hasn’t disappeared however it has tighten up somewhat.

Would I recommend this?  Yes!  Not only for increasing a healthy glow, but improving the pleasure and fun of finding ways to find the joy in oneself.  With my kids aging out, and  nature becoming a bigger focus of attention, one experience I am learning from nature is the joy in living life being me, exactly as I am!  As the playful, adventurous qualities return, exploring nature is supporting deepened and intimate life changes!   Appreciation for nature is deepening appreciation for self!  Maybe I will stop covering up my neck!


Love your skin, apply living ingredients,  If you can eat it or drink it, it’s healthy for your body!  

Get 10 teabags on-line

or 30 Tea-Bags


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Instagram follower shares exciting anti-aging techniques using: Butterfly Pea

Renee Lindstrom,  GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

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This flower has anti-oxidants that are great for anti-aging.  After posting a picture of Butterfly Tea yesterday, an instagram follower shared  anti-aging mask ingredients.  I couldn’t find a recipe so I have been experimenting this morning.

This is the one that has worked the best for me.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons Agar Agar Powder (thickening agent)
  • 1 to 2 tablespoon or tea bag of  Dried or Fresh Butterfly Flowers
  • 3/4 Cup Hot Water

As you can see in this picture I used my favorite tea cup from the Empress Hotel here in Victoria.  It would hold 3/4 of a cup of water.

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Agar Agar, Butterfly Pea Flowers

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Butterfly Pea Flowers in Hot Water

I used hot water from tea kettle and infused whole dried butterfly flowers in a cup. After a number of minutes I strained and added Agar Agar powder slowly while stirring until the consistency felt right.  It was heavier to stir with the spoon.

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Too thin

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Thicker

I found that the mixture needed to be cool enough to apply thickly to your face.  If you apply it when it is too warm it isn’t thick enough to stick.  Wait a number of minutes and then apply.  Apply by letting it pour downwards from a brush or make up wedge over your face leaning over a sink. By letting it pour downwards you are getting a thicker mask and more coverage.

Leave on for 20 or more minutes.  It cools into a gelatin and should peel off easily!DSC_0862

On my face I noticed a difference after 3 or 4 minutes.  The first thing I felt was that my skin became incredibly alive with a cool and refreshing feeling.  It was like my skin on my face was waking up!  The second thing I noticed was a tightening!  The third is my skin began to feel like it was radiating!

After taking off the mask I noticed my skin was a lighter colour.  The age spot that is growing on my check that I have been experimenting with to either reduce it or diminish the colour was lighter.  Two moles have become lighter.  I wasn’t expecting this.  I also had dark bags under my eyes due to a current Tumeric/Black Pepper detox I am currently undertaking and I believe the deep yellow colour was diminished.  I added more mask under my eyes and on the age spot.   Removing it a second time, the spot it lighter and the yellow is missing under my eyes! I am now experimenting with the age spots on my hands that have begun appearing!  Will keep you updated.

I personally would repeat this and will explore a combination of plants to infuse with it.   I so look forward to germinating the seeds I was gifted, growing and harvesting these amazing flower vines myself! This is a plant for my Medicine Garden!

Love your skin, apply living ingredients,  If you can eat it or drink it, it’s healthy for your body!  

Purchase dried flowers for tea

Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

 

Blue Butterfly Pea

 Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Rich Royal Blue Butterfly Pea

Also known as: Asian Pigeon Wings, Blue Bell Vine, Blue Pea and Darwin pea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clitoria Ternatea – Flowering Vine originally from Asia

For Xmas I was given this fabulous tea that included Blue/Indigo dried flowers shown in the above picture.  I discovered my tea turned a royal blue until a drop of lemon was added.  With lemon the tea turned a beautiful purple!  What fun.  Now I have been given a gift of seeds for this flower.

Medicinal Benefits

Researching this plant I have discovered it is a mood enhancer and  in ayurvedic medicine it has been used for; enhancing memory, increasing cognitive functions, anti-depressant, anxiety, stress, and sedative.  It is also an antioxidant.  Active components are being researched for its antimicrobial and anticancer agents.

  • Eye Sight, Skin & Hair

When drinking infused tea or water from this flower one receives the benefits of  anthocyanin which sharpens one’s eyesight and increases night vision.  Quercetin is a Bioflavinoid that reduces free radicals and supports healthy skin and hair.  It helps reduce the signs of aging by increasing the collagen and elasticity of ones skin cells!

When used as a shampoo it darkens hair!

Read more on the Butterfly Pea  – Tissue Culture and Antimicrobial Activity of Clitoria ternatea L.: Callogenesis, Organogenesis and Total yield from Butterfly pea  – By Syeda Qamar Nayab Batool


 

  • anthocyanin – a blue, violet, or red flavonoid pigment found in plants
  • antioxidant – occurs naturally in plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables, coffee, tea, wine, and chocolate and they protect your cells from the effects of free radicals and can help reduce an overabundance of inflammation and neutralize free radicals, prevent cellular damage, support the liver and enhance immunity
  • ayurvedic – one of the world’s oldest holistic (“whole-body”) healing systems developed more than 3,000 years ago
  • bioflavinoid – are super-antioxidants found in many natural foods
  • quercetin – antioxidant found in fruits, vegetables, tea, wine and supplements

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

 

 

Turmeric – Black Pepper Water Challenge!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

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I have challenged myself to drink Turmeric Water for 30 Days.  My purpose is to support my liver, my heart/brain connection and to use this as an anti-inflammatory.   I have read that our hearts have a direct reflection on our brain health. If our heart is clogged up so is our brain!  I drink this before eating anything in the morning.

After drinking this water I wait an hour prior to eating afterwards.  What I have noticed so far:

Day #1 – I noticed that my thyroid seemed to jump for a couple of seconds about an hour after drinking Turmeric Water and later in the day,  after about 8 hours of drinking it,  I felt adrenaline course through my body and  I started to feel extremely hungry!  Drinking this water is far more effective and faster acting than the capsules I have taken previously!  

Day #2 – All day I felt my adrenaline course through my body.  At one point I  I had the thought that I may not be able to continue this challenge if this kept up! I felt extremely hungry! 

Day #3 – My adrenaline was settled for the day, however, my lower belly felt warm all day and into the evening.  My gut felt alkaline.  Pressure in my lower back disappeared completely!

Day #4 – The day has just started however what I have felt since drinking this a couple of hours ago is warm with a clear, settled mind.  My gut and mouth feels alkaline.  Waking in the morning with pain in an injured wrist I noticed that after drinking Turmeric Water the pain  disappeared.

I look forward to more days exploring this morning drink and health benefits.  

Purchase Turmeric & Black Pepper


In researching this drink I have read that the healing properties in Turmeric can be enhanced and absorbed more easily  by our bodies if taken with black pepper!  Never using black pepper in my drinks before  I was curious about it.  what I am noticing is a nice warm feeling that I enjoy.  It is comfort.  

Turmeric Water 

  • 1 teaspoon of ground Turmeric 
  • 1/4 teaspoon  ground Black-pepper
  • 8 oz glass of water

You can heat up water adding turmeric and pepper.  I simply use room temperature water and blend in a blender before drinking.  

Turmeric Pepper Paste

  • 1/4 cup turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper
  • 1/2 cup of water

Heat ingredients while stirring until thickened.  When it forms a paste take off heat and store in glass container.  Keeps in fridge.  Enjoy 2 tables spoons a day as garnish for your recipes or on salad.  

Turmeric Tea 

  • 3 teaspoons ground turmeric 
  • 1 teaspoon ground cloves
  • 2 teaspoons ground cardamon
  • 2 teaspoons ground ginger
  • 3.5 pints of filtered water
  • Raw Honey or Stevia 
  • Nut milk optional

Begin to heat water  while adding ingredients and simmer.  Enjoy!  

Purchase Turmeric Products  & Black Pepper


Curcumin is an active ingredient in Turmeric that has more than 7000 reviewed scientific articles explaining its health benefits. It is used in homeopathic medicine and a medicine in  Chinese and India.  It is used as an antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and for anti-aging.  It comes from the dried, powdered roots of the Curcuma longa plant.  

Black pepper is known to reduce a receptor known as TRPV1 in the body that automatically reduces pain throughout the body.

Turmeric and black pepper raise the levels of serotonin and dopamine in your brain and inhibit mono-amine oxidase.  The hormones increase happiness and  the enzyme is often linked to depression.  Together these two spices can be used to improve your mood.  

Turmeric Turmeric is used in Ayurveda applications and a herb believed to cleanse the chakras. It is aligned with the Solar Plexus Chakra and a garden plant I would recommend for your personal healing garden.  I would plant it in the center circle.  

Purchase Turmeric Products & Black Pepper


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Bamboo

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

 

In 2012 my son and I received an offer to come by a clients and dig up some bamboo that was invading their driveway.  After planting it the shoots all died back and I wondered if bamboo would ever grow.  For two years it sat idle and it wasn’t until the third season it began to grow.  It grew quickly and by the fourth it was filling in the spaces between plants. Now it is hardy with a steady growth of new stocks and leaves. It is strong and flexible.

Bamboo is the a fast growing woody plant that is considered a grass in the true grass family Poaceae.  This family has over 10,000 species native to Asia and imported to North America as a decorative plant for landscaping.

Making Tea with Bamboo Leaves

There are a number of different types of bamboo leaves used for commercial  tea processing.  The Indocalamus Longiauritu pictured above is the bamboo that I have growing in my garden.

I have discovered the leaves of the Indocalamus Longiauritu were in a Chinese scientific study that suggests it has comparable components, biological activity and effective qualities to ginkgo leaves. The extract of the leaves was shown to have excellent resistance to radical, anti-oxidation, anti-aging, lowering of blood lipid and micro-circulation of blood cholesterol, dilated capillaries, clearing up, activation of the brain and memory, improve sleep, fight cancer, and had an effect of  beautifying the skin.

These bamboo leaves contain a lot of flavone and lactone, chlorophyll, amino acids, polysaccharides, vitamins, trace elements and other nutrients.  Active ingredients found are flavonoids compounds, biologically active polysaccharides and other phenolic acid derivatives, Anthraquinone compounds, amino acids and terpene Lactone, special active peptides, manganese, zinc, selenium and other trace elements.

They found it could efficiently regulate body fat, and has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, improve immunity function.

In North America the Tea wholesalers suggest that Bamboo Leaf Tea has 10 times the amount of vegetable silica than horsetail.  Horsetail has 5-8% vegetable silica versus the bamboo plant which is made up of 70% silica.  Vegetable silica helps to fix calcium, so that the body can store more of this mineral and then use it to repair bones, collagen and other body tissues.  Silica is water-soluble and so it is highest in the tea.  If the body doesn’t use the silica it flushes it  out of the body.  Therefore drinking tea through the day is recommended.

A high silica content has shown to cut hair loss, increase growth and improve vitality.

Steps for preparing Bamboo leaves for Tea

  1. Pick new bamboo leaves
  2. Wash & drain leaves
  3. Dry fry in a pan until leaves start to turn brown

Preparing Bamboo Tea

  1. Gently bring dried bamboo leaves to a boil
  2. Reduce after a few minutes and steep to taste.

If you don’t have bamboo in your garden, get tea here:

Bamboo Leaf Tea

30 Day Bamboo Leaf Tea Challenge


Bamboo as a Medicinal

Bamboo leaves have been used in Chinese medicine for hundreds of years and in the Indian Ayurveda.  They have used  the Bamboo leaf extract and tea for detoxification of the body, to aid in digestion, in the treatment of blood diseases and inflammation, for protection against cancer and for improving sleep quality.

Bamboo is considered sweet, cooling, diuretic, febrifuge, expectorant and controls vomiting, stems bleeding and has been used for bacterial infections.


 

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.