Celebrating milestone with nature’s beauty

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

This is the time of year to have a birthday!  Imagine the edible bounty that is on display almost moment by moment as it emerges!  To celebrate with a good friend the morning began with foraging out in the yard.

Garnish

The edible garnish you see are pansy, cherry blossoms  forget me nots on the celebratory dessert.   On the plate the edible garnish you see fresh native current (of the Pacific Northwest), wild English daisy, dandelion, rosemary, butterbur, polyanthus, forsythia and oxalis flowers, wild garlic chives, and columbine leaves. The hard boiled egg was dyed with scotch broom flowers the evening before.  

Salad

The salad the ingredients was what was available that morning.  We had overwintered veggies; red lettuce, small kale and Swiss chard leaves, hairy bitter cress, purple dead nettle, dandelion, malva, yellow dock and herb Robert leaves (weeds),  rosemary, mint and oregano leaves, angelica and fennel, chives and the leaves from the flowers; creeping jennyoxalis, barren strawberries, butterbur, hollyhock, forget me nots.  

Soup

Began with a beef broth and miso.  The ingredients added came from the yard.  These included overwintered leeks, kale and Swiss chard together with a few herbs, rosemary and oregano.  Sprinkled on top – rosemary flowers.

Tea

Tea was a wonderful infusion of bay laurel leaves!

Keeping it simple, for me,  heightens the flavours of all the ingredients and there isn’t the heaviness of eating afterwards, only a sense of full filled that lasts through out the day! That means no snacking!!!!

I heard back that this was the best birthday lunch ever!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Back Yard Salad in March!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Foraging for the day’s yard salad ingredients we found these to add to the garden parsley, swiss chard and kale that is emerging.   Bowls were overflowing and it’s only the end of March!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

March 18th & Already a Back Yard Salad

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

In Mid-March buds, leaves and flowers began emerging on the plants in our community. On March 17th some back yard weeds and flowers were added to the salad and by March 18th it was a “back yard salad!”    During the fall and winter you forget the taste of all the fresh differences in using many leaves, herbs and flowers.  There was only one dandelion flower to pick among many weeks bursting through.

On March 19th there was a realization that a forager could begin eating fresh backyard veggies, weeds and flowers for the next few seasons!  As the season age the contents of the backyard salad would change as flowers, weeds and veggies come and go! In the picture above on the 20th ingredients where picked between clients to sit in water until later break! You can see more was added overnight.

Along with the 30 day Turmeric and Black Pepper Challenge,  another one has been made.  The challenge is to continue into Spring and Summer eating only back yard and foraged veggies, leaves, weeds, roots and flowers!   Today will be Day 2!

Read growing list of what’s growing in the backyard!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.