Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com)

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Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis) Photo by Renee Lindstrom

Also known as:  Evening Star,  Butter Rose, Cowslip, Fever Plant & King’s Cure-all, Sun Cup

Uses: Culinary, Medicinal, Tea

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves, Stems, Roots

Preparation:  Cosmetics, Essential Oil, Flower Essence, Infused Honey & Oils, Recipes, Tinctures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Symbolizes:   Life of Fulfillment
  • Language of Flowers: Fickleness, faithlessness, sweet memories
  • Associated with: Protection, Love & Luck
  • Chakras:  Root, Sacral & Heart
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Moon
This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Culinary

All parts of the evening Primrose can be integrated into ones diet.  The roots can be eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable.  They grow large and are similar in appearance to parsnips and can be cooked like potatoes, carrots or parsnips.  One can add them fresh or dried to soups and , stews.  The leaves can be added to salad or steamed if tough and flowers can be added to salads and used as garnish or decoration on cakes, custards and puddings.

The seed pods can be roasted or when dried the seeds inside can be ground and added to smoothies, shakes, cereals, breads, muffins, etc.

Health & Wellness

“A study by the Highland Psychiatric Research Group at the Draig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, Scotland, found that evening primrose encouraged regeneration of liver cells damaged by alcohol consumption. Other researchers think it may also prevent alcoholic poisoning, hangovers, postdrink depression and alcohol withdrawal. It is thought to stop alcohol from damaging brain cells by bolstering them with unsaturated fats”  Herbalpedia

  • Evening Primrose has:
    • protein
    • carbohydrates
    • beta carotene
    • calcium
    • potassium
    • vitamin B3
    • Omega-6
    • amino acid tryptophan
    • bioflavonoid quercetin
  • Herbal Actions:
    • Gentle Sedative & Mood Enhancer – relaxing, grounding and uplifting
    • Anti-spasmodic – PMS cramping
    • Endocrine System  – relaxing
    • First Aid – bruised cuts, scratches, bug bites & stings
    • Digestion – stimulant, cooling & healing inflammation
    • Eczema & Rosacea – used topically
    • Hair Growth – used topically
  • Nutrition (per 1/2 cup):
    • Protein: 2.4 g
    • Carbs 7.3 g
    • Calcium 140 mg
    • Potassium 410 mg
    • Beta Carotene 4000 ug
    • Niacin 700  ug
  • Early North American uses:
    • Ojibwa – poultice for bruises
    • Cherokee – root tea to lose weight
    • Shakers – poultice for wounds & leave or root tea for upset stomach
  • Folklore:
    • increase desirably to potential lovers & friends – infuse into bath for encouraging inner beauty to shine through
    • Magical use in spells for increasing success in achieving ones goals

 

Growing Evening Primrose

The flower of the Evening Primrose may open before dusk, however the scent of the flower is not released until evening.  It is Native to Canada and the United States.  It is a self seeder so it can be found growing in full sun along rocky roads, in meadows, on dunes and beaches.  It has been naturalized in parts of Europe by Early Settlers transporting seeds back as early as 1614.  I have started mine by seed in the Spring as starters and transplanted them.  They seem to be hardy and though they enjoy full sun, these pictured above are growing in partial shade and are 1 year bloomers (unusual).  I would consider now starting them later in summer or early fall to have them come up as second year plants in spring.

Buy Canadian Evening Primrose Seeds

More Edible Garden Plants 

 

Recommended:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Feverfew for preventing migraines & headaches?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

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Feverfew

Feverfew:  Leaves & Flowers

Feverfew:  Tanacetum parthenium

I began growing Feverfew 22 years ago from a packet of  Richter Seeds I ordered on-line.  It was a garden plant that helped change a dysfunctional and depressed James Bay community with it’s brilliant white petals and yellow centers.  To me they looked like miniature daisy’s.

Rediscovering them in the past few years growing in vacant lots and gardens, I once again started to harvest their medicinal flowers and leaves.

Feverfew is a well-known herb for migraine and joint pain relief so I dried a supply of both flowers and leaves for tea.  Using fresh plant parts I used them to add to daily water recipes for their nutrients and infused them in vinegar, oil and alcohol to create medicinal remedies.


Nutrients & Qualities in Feverfew: 

The nutrients in Feverfew include iron, niacin, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, selenium, silicon, sodium, and vitamins A and C.


Medicinal Uses:

Feverfew has an amazing number of medicinal uses:

  • prevention of migraines & headaches,
  • fevers,
  • muscle tension,
  • lower blood pressure,
  • reduce stomach irritation,
  • appetite stimulant,
  • improve digestion,
  • kidney function,
  • colitis,
  • dizziness,
  • tinnitus,
  • menstrual problems,
  • muscle relaxant,
  • skin washes,
  • Pain reliever for gastrointestinal, reproductive, and vascular systems,
  • Insect Repellent (includes Bees & Fleas!),
    • flowers contain pyrethrins compounds used as flea repellent
  • Natural Sun Screen,
  • Arthritis,
  • Anti-inflammatory

How to use Feverfew:

  • Preventative for Migraines

As a preventative herb for migraines and headaches it is recommended to chew 2 – 3 fresh leaves per day.  However I would recommend that these leaves be left to wilt beforehand as this plant has a strong bitter taste and cause some skin irritation in mouth when taken directly from the plant.  It is also recommended that one takes this herb together with magnesium and riboflavin to support opening constrictions in blood flow.

  • Natural Flea Rinse for Cats & Dogs

To make a flea rinse for your pet, pour boiling water over the fresh herbs and let stand until completely cooled. Strain and apply wetting the fur and skin thoroughly. Do not towel dry or rinse. Remember that this will last only a couple of hours so make it a regular part of your animal care routine!

  • Natural Pain Reliever for Aging Cats & Dogs

This is a herb that can be infused in water in the same way you would make tea.  Once cooled add to your pets water to act as a natural pain reliever.

Oils, tincture & Tea Recipes 

Buy Canadian Feverfew Plants


Recommended Reading:

More than 100 Remedies from 20 of the Most Healing Plants

Review:  Kathrine – This is the book I have been looking for! Very easy way to learn a LOT of information fast. I am have three regular items I make myself with great
success! My husband has even been wanting to put his hands into prep work.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

2017-04-14 13.02.01

Rosemary in bloom

Uses:  Culinary, Medicinal, Cosmetic, Massage Oil, Aromatherapy, Purifier, Love Potion

Parts Used:  Flowers, Leaves

Preparation:  Spice, Vinegar,  Tea, Tincture, Infused Oil, Flower Essence, Essential Oil,  Memory Enhancer, Incense


  • Symbolizes:   Wisdom, Love, Protection
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Remembrance
  • Associated with:  3rd Chakra
  • Element:  Fire
  • Governed:  Leo
This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

This rosemary plant has been a part of my family for a good 15 years.  It began as a small seedling in a pot that moved around with us.  Once planted at it’s current location it sprang to life in a new way.  Planted with protection in mind, it is located at the entrance to my home and also my business pathway.   Anyone walking towards either entrance-way faces this magnificent rosemary plant.

When cutting  branches and picking flowers for creating essential oils, tinctures, infused oils and vinegar’s, and drying for tea, I also lay branches along the front and side property lines to establish an intentional boundary.  I sense the energy of this rosemary plant as a protective mother and call her, “Mother,” however I have just read that this plant is male in nature.

Health & Wellness

The roots, leaves and berries are used for medicinal remedies and the flowers and the leaves are edible.  The wood has been used to make musical instruments!

Rosemary contains antibacterial and antioxidant,  rosmarinic acid, essential oils such as cineol, camphene, borneol, bornyl acetate, and α-pinene that are known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties.

Buy Canadian Rosemary Seeds

Some beneficial health constituents of Rosemary for you to consider getting fresh from your own plant and replacing processed capsules and pills are listed below. Your body will be happier as living minerals and vitamins are easier to digest and are in deeper alignment with your how your body absorbs and processes their benefits resulting in fuller and more whole system of well-being.   Many vitamin pills go in and come out whole!

  • Vitamin A,
  • Vitamin B’s (pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin, folates)
  • Vitamin C,
  • Manganese,
  • Iron,
  • Potassium,
  • Fiber,
  • Copper,
  • Calcium,
  • Magnesium

Uses of Rosemary are:

  • Combat oxidative stress in the brain,
  • Improve memory,
  • Improve mood,
  • Hair tonic to restore grey hair to natural colour, stop split ends, stop dandruff and grow new hair,
  • Increase circulation,
  • Reduce aches and pains,
  • Antiseptic,
  • Astringent,
  • Antioxidant,
  • Vision,
  • Healthy skin,
  • Lung, breast and mouth cancers,
  • Fighting infection,
  • Improve blood and control heart rate and blood pressure

Buy Canadian Rosemary Seeds

The flowers of the rosemary have a higher potency of the above qualities therefore this year I have managed to infuse a tincture remedy along with an oil and a vinegar?  I am excited to explore these flower infusions.  This rosemary has not flowered in quite the same way in the past and I find this exciting and have appreciation to this plant!   Here is a picture of the oil and the vinegar infusion.  You can  see after only 12 hours the vinegar has begun to become the colour of the flowers.  The vinegar began with it’s own apple cider colour so the flower dye is quite dominant.

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Infusing Rosemary Flowers

#yyj Non-Native Winter Flowering Edible & Medicinal Shrubs


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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000