Garden plants that can be dried for teas, cosmetics & herbal remedies

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

by Renee Lindstrom

Medicinal & Beauty Cabinet of Backyard Forager

Above is a picture of plants gathered from our yard and surrounding community (less than kilometer away) that have been dried and are being saved for tea, cosmetics and herbal remedies.   Below are lists of the seeds, leaves, stems and roots from our garden that have been dried.  Links to plant properties are included on some and are highlighted.  

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Seeds

Seeds are the fruit of the the plant and can be saved for future planting, used in cooking & baking and for sprouting.  Some seeds can be ground into flour, prepared as a coffee replacement or for tea

More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Flowers

Dried flowers can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies, infused honey, to add scent & colour to recipes,  to make natural dyes and used as potpourri

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Leaves

Dried leaves can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies and to make natural dyes

More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Root

Dried roots can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies 

  • Comphrey
  • Dandelion
  • Mullein
  • Yellow Dock

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Here are some of the ways I process my harvest

Once the plants are harvested it’s time for us to get creative.  Here are some of the ways that we enjoy integrating the garden harvest into our lives:

 

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Recommended Reading:

  • Backyard Medicine – Harvest and Make Your Own Herbal Remedies by Authors
    Julie-Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal
  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • The Modern Herbal Dispensatory: A Medicine-Making Guide by North Atlantic Books, 2016, by Thomas Easley (Author), Steven Horne (Author)

    Book Comment:  5.0 out of 5 stars – This is a great book about making herbal medicine – By L. Meissneron on June 23, 2017
    Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase:  This is a great book about making herbal medicine. It goes into great detail with the different ways to make herbal medicine and specific ways to prepare certain plants. There are also tons of great herbal recipes to follow. Not just for beginners, but those who what to expand their knowledge of herbal preparations.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

 

Privet ( ligustrum lucidum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:

tea kettleDyeMortar

2017-08-30 14.40.02

Also known as:

Uses: Medicinal Remedies, Dye, Tea

Parts Used:  Berries, Flowers, Leaves, Bark

Preparation:  Tea, Vinegar, Oil, Tincture, Infusion, Flower Essence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Symbolizes:   Healing old wounds, letting go of blocks
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Mildness, Prohibitive
  • Associated with:  Sacral Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by: Moon

Part of the olive family (Oleaceae)

I planted what I thought was a small shrub five years ago that was gifted to us. With no identifying information to go along with I was surprised after two years when it began stretching, spreading and growing taller.  It is now 10 feet high and getting wider.  According to different sources of information could grow from 15 to 30 feet high.  The is the evergreen that many topiary cuttings are created with and it is popular for use in Bonsai.  It flowered for the first time two years ago and this year there are many fruits developing as we enter into fall.  The flowers are a nice fragrance to begin with but slowly they become less attractive over the days as the blooms diminish.  This year this Privet is gifting us with an abundance of fruit that are forming from the spent flowers.  When the fruits are ripe in the fall, these are the main part of this plant used in Traditional Chinese and Herbal Remedies.  The leaves, flowers and bark can also used.  You will find the dried berries ground up in many medicinal and beauty products!

Nutrients & Qualities: 

Privet has applications as a  diuretic, astringent, antiseptic, immuno-stimulant, anti-cholestrolemic and it has anti-cancer properties.  It is known to invigorate the immune system.

  • Constituents:
    • quercetin glycosides;  flavonol glycosides, secoiridoids (oleuropein, ligustaloside A, ligustaloside B, and ligstroside)
    • kaempferol glycosides
    • polyphenols
    • oleanolic
    • palmitic
    • linoleic
    • ursolic acids
    • mannitol
    • glucose
    • starch
    • bitter resin
    • bitter extractive
    • albumen
    • salts
    • ligustrin

Therapeutic Uses:

  • Flowers:
    • Headaches
    • Vaginal Irritations
    • Menstrual Problems
  • Leaves:
    • Diarrhea
    • Bladder disorders
    • Stomach ulcers
    • Indigestion
    • Increase appetite
    • Sore throat & eyes
    • Ulcers
    • Swellings
    • Mumps
    • Chapped lips
    • Throat cancer
  • Leaves & bark: 
    • Headaches
    • Tumours
    • Bronchitis
    • Coughs
    • Light-headedness
    • Chronic bowel problems
    • Vaginal douche
    • Mouthwash or gargle
    • Wash for skin problems
  • Berries/Seeds:
    • Liver & Kidney ailments
    • Increase energy
    • Menopause
    • Insomnia
    • Premature aging
    • Grey hair
    • Heart palpitations
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Tinnitus (a ringing in the ear)
    • Backache
    • Eye issues including cataracts, glaucoma & cataract
    • Contagious ailments: hepatitis B & sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
    • High blood pressure (hypertension)
    • Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia (a fungal infection of the lungs)
    • Respiratory problems

How to use Leaves & Bark:

Boil 1 tsp. leaves or bark in 1 cup water. Take 1 to 2 cups a day.


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy
    • on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

3 Steps to create a simple foragers drying rack with ease without spending any money on it!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP –  – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

by Renee Lindstrom

Drying flowers, Leaves, & Roots – July , 2017

 

For years drying roots, leaves, blossoms and bark has been a visual and unorganized nightmare for my personality!  However my need to dry was greater than my ease for comfort!  We have high automobile traffic outside and inside we have an air filter.  This is why I dry garden plants inside.

After many years of using screens and cardboard spontaneously this solution appeared. This process settled down my irritation stimulated by the clutter of drying!

The materials are simple and items you may have in your household already.  I had them!

You need:  clothes rack, plant trays and parchment paper.

  • Step one – set out the rack
  • Step two – line trays with parchment paper
  • Step three – place on clothes rack evenly to balance the weight

The convenience is that the trays are uniform, fit nicely on the rack with the added benefit of air circulation under the shelf.  You can see that the basket, though visually attractive, is not efficient and visually distracting!  It may also absorb unwanted waste over time whereas the parchment paper may be a cleaner solution.


Now your ready to gather and dry your own plant materials to make:

 

Check out my list of garden plants that I have been drying for some ideas.

This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Recommended Reading:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

2017-04-14 13.02.01

Rosemary in bloom

Uses:  Culinary, Medicinal, Cosmetic, Massage Oil, Aromatherapy, Purifier, Love Potion

Parts Used:  Flowers, Leaves

Preparation:  Spice, Vinegar,  Tea, Tincture, Infused Oil, Flower Essence, Essential Oil,  Memory Enhancer, Incense


  • Symbolizes:   Wisdom, Love, Protection
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Remembrance
  • Associated with:  3rd Chakra
  • Element:  Fire
  • Governed:  Leo
This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

This rosemary plant has been a part of my family for a good 15 years.  It began as a small seedling in a pot that moved around with us.  Once planted at it’s current location it sprang to life in a new way.  Planted with protection in mind, it is located at the entrance to my home and also my business pathway.   Anyone walking towards either entrance-way faces this magnificent rosemary plant.

When cutting  branches and picking flowers for creating essential oils, tinctures, infused oils and vinegar’s, and drying for tea, I also lay branches along the front and side property lines to establish an intentional boundary.  I sense the energy of this rosemary plant as a protective mother and call her, “Mother,” however I have just read that this plant is male in nature.

Health & Wellness

The roots, leaves and berries are used for medicinal remedies and the flowers and the leaves are edible.  The wood has been used to make musical instruments!

Rosemary contains antibacterial and antioxidant,  rosmarinic acid, essential oils such as cineol, camphene, borneol, bornyl acetate, and α-pinene that are known to have anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, and antiseptic properties.

Buy Canadian Rosemary Seeds

Some beneficial health constituents of Rosemary for you to consider getting fresh from your own plant and replacing processed capsules and pills are listed below. Your body will be happier as living minerals and vitamins are easier to digest and are in deeper alignment with your how your body absorbs and processes their benefits resulting in fuller and more whole system of well-being.   Many vitamin pills go in and come out whole!

  • Vitamin A,
  • Vitamin B’s (pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, riboflavin, folates)
  • Vitamin C,
  • Manganese,
  • Iron,
  • Potassium,
  • Fiber,
  • Copper,
  • Calcium,
  • Magnesium

Uses of Rosemary are:

  • Combat oxidative stress in the brain,
  • Improve memory,
  • Improve mood,
  • Hair tonic to restore grey hair to natural colour, stop split ends, stop dandruff and grow new hair,
  • Increase circulation,
  • Reduce aches and pains,
  • Antiseptic,
  • Astringent,
  • Antioxidant,
  • Vision,
  • Healthy skin,
  • Lung, breast and mouth cancers,
  • Fighting infection,
  • Improve blood and control heart rate and blood pressure

Buy Canadian Rosemary Seeds

The flowers of the rosemary have a higher potency of the above qualities therefore this year I have managed to infuse a tincture remedy along with an oil and a vinegar?  I am excited to explore these flower infusions.  This rosemary has not flowered in quite the same way in the past and I find this exciting and have appreciation to this plant!   Here is a picture of the oil and the vinegar infusion.  You can  see after only 12 hours the vinegar has begun to become the colour of the flowers.  The vinegar began with it’s own apple cider colour so the flower dye is quite dominant.

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Infusing Rosemary Flowers

#yyj Non-Native Winter Flowering Edible & Medicinal Shrubs


Read more @ Living in Natures Love:


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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

 

5 Fun & easy steps to create your own Tinctures

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Mullein, Feverfew & Gumweek Tinctures

Mullein, Feverfew & Gumweed Tinctures

Foraging for Gumweed and Feverfew along the Pacific Coast of Vancouver Island and picking Mullein from my garden has become a favorite activity.  Picking the flowers, leaves and digging the roots to make remedies is a creative passion!  It is also a way to connect with the live ingredients that go into the healing remedies I will have on hand to take for acute and preventive care.  I believe that handling the plants that one will take as a tincture will increase the benefits of it.  One immediate benefit is the cost.  It is cheaper to make tinctures than it is to buy them.  For more on plants foraged from one’s backyard and along  the Pacific Northwest visit Inventory of a Backyard Forager.

A tincture is a remedy that has integrated the healing properties of fresh plants preserving and concentrating these qualities in liquid form.  I believe, tinctures can be effective and that energetically they are more in alignment with our own bodies electrical system.

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Materials:

  • Sterilized Mason or recycled jars & lids (any size)
  • Sterilized 1 oz. or 1/2 oz.  bottles & lids or droppers
  • Plant material; leaves, flowers or roots
  • Vodka (80% higher alcohol content) or apple cider vinegar
  • Cheesecloth or filters

I  personally do not combine flowers or leaves with the roots in tinctures or combine plants.  I purchase Vodka with a highest grade of alcohol content (80 and above) or use apple cider vinegar to pour over the plant material in the mason jar.


Steps for Creating Tinctures

Step #1 – Picking Fresh Ingredients

In making my tinctures, I use fresh ingredients making this a seasonal activity.  I pick the flowers and leaves throughout the growing season.  Occasionally I dig the roots ensuring  it doesn’t negatively affect the patch that is growing by leaving a greater amount growing than I take.  Read more backyard garden plant ideas.  Dry plant materials can be used as well.  Here are a few popular plants:


Step #2  – Process

Use sterilized dry Mason jars and fill them 3/4’s full with the  fresh flowers, leaves, or roots individually or  a combination of leaves and flowers.  Remember the size of jar will determine the amount of material and liquid needed.

Pour enough liquid to cover the plant material and  fill the jar remembering it reduces the amount of oxygen in the jar.  This is important to stop the material from molding.  To begin with the plant material expands while it absorbs the liquid before it shrinks.

Step #3 – Setting

Some suggest letting this sit for 5 to 6 weeks in a sunny window before filtering and decanting.  Jostle the jars each day to provide some liquid movement through the plant materials.

I have set it mine in a sunny window and one that gets the early morning sun and not the bright full day sun.  I prefer to set it in the early morning sun.

Step #4 – Filtering 

Use cheesecloth and/or a coffee filter to strain the plant material and pour the liquid into a sterilized mason jar and/or  1 oz and 1/2 oz bottles with droppers.  On occasion you may have to strain more than once to remove any  fine dust like material.

Step #5 – Storing

Store the alcohol based tincture in a cool cupboard and the apple cider vinegar in the fridge.  The alcohol based tincture can be kept and used for a few years.  The apple cider vinegar  has a shorter life of 3 to 6 months.


Usage 

Adults – 5 to 10 drops or 1/2 to 1 teaspoon – 3 times a day

Children – 1/2 the adult dosage

*Alcohol tinctures can be added to hot water to evaporate the alcohol before drinking

 

 


Recommended Reading:

The Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook – A Home Manual by Author
James Green

The Modern Herbal Dispensatory: A Medicine-Making Guide by North Atlantic Books, 2016, by Thomas Easley (Author), Steven Horne (Author)

 


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


 

Natural Remedies with Gumweed

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

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Decanting infusions after a six week immersion of gumweed in honey, gumweed in oil and gumweed in vodka!

Grindelia squarrosa – Commonly known as Gumweed

Grindelia’s gummy balsamic resin was historically used as an expectorant, antitussive in cough remedies and in ointments, field dressings for rashes, poison ivy, burns, and insect bites.

Grindelia contains diterpenes (including grindelic acid), resins, and flavonoids.

 

Every day for six weeks the infusion of gumweed and honey has been jostled, along with gumweed in oil, and gumweed in vodka.   All three jar were filtered through 3 layers of cheesecloth and a strainer into new sterilized jars.

Tasting each one was a surprise.  Gumweed has a strong smelling resin that I expected  to be mouth puckering, yet it turned out to be a milder and nicer tasting flavour. It did remind me of ouzo.

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

 

Gumweed a natural medicinal

Gumweed  is used medicinally for supporting a healthy respiratory tract naturally.  It will get at dry, unproductive coughs, and aid in the normal production and elimination of mucous.  It can be used to make natural remedies such as; cough syrup and tinctures.

Recipe for creating infused honey

Recipe for creating tinctures

Buy Canadian Gumweed Seeds

Gumweed infused in Oil

Can be used as a topical remedy for many skin disorders, including; herpes, roseola,  itching,  burns, rashes, poison ivy rash,  dermatitis, eczema, ulcers and  skin eruptions.

Recipe for creating infused oils

Buy Canadian Gumweed Seeds


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.