Horsetail

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP  This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Mortartea kettleEdibleDye

by Renee Lindstrom

Horsetail

Horsetail (Equisetum arvense)

Horsetail is edible when it first emerges from the soil before leaves sprout on stalk. After the stalk darkens in colour and starts to have leaf shoots from the circular ribs it is no longer edible yet becomes medicinal!

As horsetail absorbs the minerals from the soil surrounding it you want to ensure that the water or soil it is growing in or near is organic and not polluted.

Nutrients & Qualities in Horsetail:

Horsetail has manganese, calcium, iron, flavonoids, caffeic acid esters, saponins, tannins, alkaloids, fatty acids, phytosterols, glycosides, phenolic acids, aconitic acid, *equisetic acid and silica.

*Equisetic acid which is a heart and nerve sedative. If taken in abnormally high doses can be poisonous.

Medicinal Qualities & Uses:

  • anti-aging,
  • anti-wrinkle,
  • anti-inflammatory,
  • antibacterial,
  • antimicrobial,
  • antioxidant,
  • coagulant,
  • demulcent,
  • diuretic,
  • astringent
  • anemia,
  • arthritis, brittle bone,
  • eyes,
    • conjunctivitis,
  •  hair,
    • hair loss
  • skin
    • acne
    • anti-aging
    • anti-wrinkle
    • burns
    • rashes
  • teeth,
  • nails,
  • gingivitis,
  • tonsillitis,
  • rheumatic disorders,
  • osteoarthritis,
  • diabetes,
  • wounds,
  • frostbite,
  • chilblains,
  • athlete’s foot,
  • boils,
  • carbuncles,
  • ulcers,
  • fistulas,
  • herpes simplex,
  • dyspepsia (impaired digestion),
  • gastrointestinal conditions,
  • cardiovascular diseases,
  • respiratory tract infections,
  • bronchitis,
  • fever,
  • malaria,
  • bladder problems,
  • urinary tract infection,
  • bed wetting,
  • kidney stones,
  • prostate problems,
  • hemorrhoids,
  • muscle cramps,
  • tumors,
  • broken bones,
  • fractures,
  • sprains,
  • nose bleed,
  • immune system

How to use:

The above ground parts of Horsetail are used and can be in dried or liquid form.  It needs to be cooked, dried, boiled or infused.  It cannot be eaten raw.

by Renee Lindstrom

Dried Horsetail

  • Drying Horsetail for Tea/Water Infusions:

Horsetail stalk and leaves can be picked, rinsed and dried.  When it dried it should remain green.  Do not use if it turns brown.

  • Horsetail Tea – max. 3 cups per day

Add 1 – 2 Teaspoons of dried or fresh Horsetail to boiling water and steep for 7 to 10 minutes.

  • Sore Throats, Coughs, Colds and Lungs

Horsetail tea can be soothing to use as a gargle for sore throats and beneficial to clear airways when breathing in its steam while boiling this herb.

  • Poultice

Crush fresh Horsetail and soak in hot water for a few minutes or soak dried horsetail in hot water, drain and place in cheesecloth to apply to area.  Leave for up to 15 minutes a few times a day.

  • Toner

Steep 1  teaspoon of Horsetail to 1 cup of boil water and steep for up to 10 minutes. When cool use cotton ball to dampen with tea solution and dab facial skin and neck to rinse in the morning and evening after removing makeup.

  • Hair Rinse or Bath Infusion

Use up to 10 teaspoons of fresh or dried horsetail to 4 cups of hot water and add to your bath or use to rinse your hair.

  • Oils, Creams & Salves

Fresh or dried Horsetail can be processed into oils and combined with other oils, plants and herbs to make salves and creams.  Find recipes here

If you don’t have a source of Fresh Horsetail find dried on-line here.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Why infuse Dandelion & Water?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

by Renee Lindstrom

Dandelion Infused Water

The picture above shows spring and summers first blossoms in our morning infused water that starts our day at Inside Awareness for Healthy Lifestyles.  For stronger liver support, increasing bile dandelion leaves will be added too!  The qualities in the leaves are stronger than in the flowers.  This includes bitterness.  While the flowers are sweet the greens are bitter.

Drinking  infused water with immune system builders is one way to protect ones own health to ensure ongoing wellness.


Why dandelion infused water?

  • Gentle laxative
  • Antibacteral
  • Source of antioxidants
  • Increases blood circulation
  • Relieve’s pain, cramps & depression (headaches, backaches, menstrual cramps)
  • Supports vision with a Compound called  helenin that is helpful for night vision and Vitamin A and Vitamin B12 good the eyes
  • Preventative for boils, skin infections, tuberculosis

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds

Buy Dried Dandelion Leaves

More on other plants; flowers, leaves, stems and roots for infusing water go to Inventory of a backyard forager.  


Read more from Living in Nature’s Love:


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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Dandelion Flower Tea Recipe

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

by Renee Lindstrom

Dandelion: Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Pick & Rinse 8 to 12 fresh flowers (organic & untreated)

12 oz of boiling water

Honey (optional sweetener)

Pour hot water over fresh flower and let steep for up to five minutes. 
 Filter dandelion tea infusion and sweeten to taste. 
Enjoy your tea moment!
(Imaginative memories of reading Classic - Wind & the Willows come to mind)

Why dandelion blossom tea?

  • Antibacteral
  • Source of antioxidants
  • Increases blood circulation
  • Relieve’s pain, cramps & depression (headaches, backaches, menstrual cramps)
  • Supports vision with a Compound called  helenin that is helpful for night vision and Vitamin A and Vitamin B12 good the eyes
  • Preventative for boils, skin infections, tuberculosis

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds

Buy Dried Dandelion Roots

Buy Dried Dandelion Leaves

 

Read more on Wind and the Willows by  Kenneth Grahame

Wind in the Willows

Back to  Recipes 

Back to  The Amazing Dandelion

How to Infuse Wildflower Oils


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

‘Oregon Grape’ (Mahonia aquifolium)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

by Renee Lindstrom

Oregon Grape

Also known as:  Mountain Grape, Rocky Mountain Grape, Holly Leaf Barberry, Mahonia, Sour Berry,

Uses:  Culinary,  Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Dye

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Culinary,  Dye,  Flower Essence,  Infused Water,  Oil, Tea, Tinctures, Vinegar

 

 

Recipes


  • Symbolizes:   Beauty, acceptance and forgiveness
  • Associated with:  3rd (Sacral) Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Jupiter

Oregon Grape (Berberis aquifolium)

On any walk around our Greater Victoria Communities you will discover the evergreen Oregon Grape Plant.   It is used extensively in landscaping and grows wild along trails and in the underbrush of the forest canapes.  In the forest it’s blooms are less abundant that is likely due to the lack of sun.  The one pictured above is one of two new plants to this garden that, with the wet spring, is heavy with flowers for it’s size.   These two plants will be the lower, spreading shrub type of Oregon Grape, while you can find taller bushes that grow to 6 to 10 feet high.  .

It is a good landscaping plant for our area as it is drought resistant, however, with lack of water over a long period it begins to look thirsty!


Health & Wellness

The roots, leaves and berries are used for medicinal remedies and the flowers are edible. This plant is sour therefore one’s liver would love it!  Most bitter herbs are considered to have some effect on the liver and the gallbladder.  In Chinese medicine the Liver is considered to be the General of the body because it directs so many physiological functions.

DSC_2833

Infused oil & tinctures using oregon grape berries

Oregon grape contains isoquinoline alkaloids which includes berberine, berbamine, and hydrastine. These alkaloids are strong antiseptics and reduce the severity of infection and skin conditions such as psoriasis.  Berberine can lower blood glucose levels, stop infections and modulate inflammation.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Infections Oregon Grape have been used to treat and currently being researched  for:

  • stimulate thyroid & balance hormone production
  • sore throats,
  • eye infections,
  • vaginal infections,
  • wounds on the skin,
  • mouth infections,
  • inflammatory bowel conditions,
  • infectious diarrhea ,
  • infections in the upper digestive tract,
  • urinary tract infections

Other uses of Oregon Grape are for:

  • headaches,
  • poor digestion,
  • blood purifier
  • acne,
  • boils,
  • eczema,
  • herpes,
  • psoriasis,
  • colorectal cancer,
  • liver cancer
Pic by Renee Lindstrom

Oregon Berries Plant Dye

I create tinctures, oils & dyes using all parts of the Oregon Grape; roots, leaves, flowers & berries.

Personal note – August 14, ’17

For an infection I picked Oregon Grape Leaves to make an infusion.  The infection was 40 percent cleared up the first day, over 80 percent the next and on the third day it was almost gone.  I did notice other area’s detoxing as well that were not the focus of taking Oregon Grape as a medicinal.  It appears I may have had a low grade sinus infection without knowing and it seems to be detoxing my elimination system!    On the evening of the 3rd day of drinking Oregon Grape’s infusion I began to notice a difference in my thyroid.  At first it was the swelling around this area of my neck had reduced.  Waking the next morning I began to become aware of a difference in my metabolism around my thyroid and through my adrenals!  I am pleasantly and happily surprised as it seems to be supporting an increase in energy and reducing fatique.     Renee Lindstrom

Infusion for Infection’s – Stronger than tea

I take 9 or so leaves and put in small pot of water.  Bring to a rolling boil, turn down and simmer until approximately half infusion is left.  Drink during the day. I drink up to 3 cups throughout the day spaced to support resolving infection.

It is recommended that one only take Oregon Grape remedies for up to 30 days before taking a break.


Harvesting Oregon Grape

The Oregon Grape is being used as a substitute for Goldenseal by many herbalists as it is no longer abundant in North America.  Currently science is trying to patent the complex Oregon Grape that is resulting in over harvesting.  This is what caused Goldenseal to disappear.  If you are foraging and harvesting the roots try and  leave roots behind to regrow.  If you are harvesting the leaves, do not strip the plant.  Leave enough for it to be vital over winter and regrow the following spring.  If you are picking the berries, leave 1/3 of them.

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since  2000