‘Hosta leaves perfect time for eating now!’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

2017-04-27 18.24.20

Hosta Leaves

Do you eat your Hosta Leaves?

Last year I waited too long and the leaves where too tough so I was more prepared this year  and kept a vigilant eye on their space in the landscape.  I did not want to be disappointed again.  They emerged yesterday large enough to pick a few leaves. At this stage they are tender and have a wonderful taste.  The taste is nicer than most leaf veggies! I use them in salads or to graze as a snack when travelling though my garden.  Grazing the plants brings me closer to the space itself and there is an absence of feeling a separation, like I have to do something to be a busy gardener. Somehow I become apart of the landscape!

Oh, a word of caution, don’t try grazing if you use chemicals on your garden! Make sure you wash them first! This is a good time to consider that you do not know the types and quantities of chemicals that are sprayed on your store bought produce.  At least in your own garden you have some control and knowledge and possibly take more care than with what you are consuming off the store shelves!!!!! For example, grain no longer goes through a drying cycle in the field.  It has been known to be sprayed with round-up!  Alive and blowing in the breeze one day and dead the very next.  Ready to put fear into perspective?

Read more about the Hosta


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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

‘Oregon Grape’ (Mahonia aquifolium)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

by Renee Lindstrom

Oregon Grape

Also known as:  Mountain Grape, Rocky Mountain Grape, Holly Leaf Barberry, Mahonia, Sour Berry,

Uses:  Culinary,  Herbal, Tea, Medicinal, Dye

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Culinary,  Dye,  Flower Essence,  Infused Water,  Oil, Tea, Tinctures, Vinegar

 

 

Recipes


  • Symbolizes:   Beauty, acceptance and forgiveness
  • Associated with:  3rd (Sacral) Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Jupiter

Oregon Grape (Berberis aquifolium)

On any walk around our Greater Victoria Communities you will discover the evergreen Oregon Grape Plant.   It is used extensively in landscaping and grows wild along trails and in the underbrush of the forest canapes.  In the forest it’s blooms are less abundant that is likely due to the lack of sun.  The one pictured above is one of two new plants to this garden that, with the wet spring, is heavy with flowers for it’s size.   These two plants will be the lower, spreading shrub type of Oregon Grape, while you can find taller bushes that grow to 6 to 10 feet high.  .

It is a good landscaping plant for our area as it is drought resistant, however, with lack of water over a long period it begins to look thirsty!


Health & Wellness

The roots, leaves and berries are used for medicinal remedies and the flowers are edible. This plant is sour therefore one’s liver would love it!  Most bitter herbs are considered to have some effect on the liver and the gallbladder.  In Chinese medicine the Liver is considered to be the General of the body because it directs so many physiological functions.

DSC_2833

Infused oil & tinctures using oregon grape berries

Oregon grape contains isoquinoline alkaloids which includes berberine, berbamine, and hydrastine. These alkaloids are strong antiseptics and reduce the severity of infection and skin conditions such as psoriasis.  Berberine can lower blood glucose levels, stop infections and modulate inflammation.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Infections Oregon Grape have been used to treat and currently being researched  for:

  • stimulate thyroid & balance hormone production
  • sore throats,
  • eye infections,
  • vaginal infections,
  • wounds on the skin,
  • mouth infections,
  • inflammatory bowel conditions,
  • infectious diarrhea ,
  • infections in the upper digestive tract,
  • urinary tract infections

Other uses of Oregon Grape are for:

  • headaches,
  • poor digestion,
  • blood purifier
  • acne,
  • boils,
  • eczema,
  • herpes,
  • psoriasis,
  • colorectal cancer,
  • liver cancer
Pic by Renee Lindstrom

Oregon Berries Plant Dye

I create tinctures, oils & dyes using all parts of the Oregon Grape; roots, leaves, flowers & berries.

Personal note – August 14, ’17

For an infection I picked Oregon Grape Leaves to make an infusion.  The infection was 40 percent cleared up the first day, over 80 percent the next and on the third day it was almost gone.  I did notice other area’s detoxing as well that were not the focus of taking Oregon Grape as a medicinal.  It appears I may have had a low grade sinus infection without knowing and it seems to be detoxing my elimination system!    On the evening of the 3rd day of drinking Oregon Grape’s infusion I began to notice a difference in my thyroid.  At first it was the swelling around this area of my neck had reduced.  Waking the next morning I began to become aware of a difference in my metabolism around my thyroid and through my adrenals!  I am pleasantly and happily surprised as it seems to be supporting an increase in energy and reducing fatique.     Renee Lindstrom

Infusion for Infection’s – Stronger than tea

I take 9 or so leaves and put in small pot of water.  Bring to a rolling boil, turn down and simmer until approximately half infusion is left.  Drink during the day. I drink up to 3 cups throughout the day spaced to support resolving infection.

It is recommended that one only take Oregon Grape remedies for up to 30 days before taking a break.


Harvesting Oregon Grape

The Oregon Grape is being used as a substitute for Goldenseal by many herbalists as it is no longer abundant in North America.  Currently science is trying to patent the complex Oregon Grape that is resulting in over harvesting.  This is what caused Goldenseal to disappear.  If you are foraging and harvesting the roots try and  leave roots behind to regrow.  If you are harvesting the leaves, do not strip the plant.  Leave enough for it to be vital over winter and regrow the following spring.  If you are picking the berries, leave 1/3 of them.

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since  2000

An uplifting plant for your well-being toolkit!

Making up some pots filled with Hens and Chicks to share with others, I  placed them in my Feldenkrais® Treatment Room until needed.  I put three pots on the windowsill and left.  When returning to the room it had a completely different feel to it. These little plants uplifted the whole space!   I was pleasantly surprised.

With them in the window while working with clients I felt a deeper sense of balance and pleasure.  As the original pots were gifted and they disappeared there was an immediate void in the space.  I will have to be aware of this as these new ones are shared with others and they leave their perch.

Hens and Chicks are wonderful plants to have in your health and well-being kit.  I am encouraging others to have a pot in their bathrooms and by their kitchen sink.  These little guys have similar qualities to aloe vera except they are easier to manage. Rather than breaking a tip off of an aloe vera,  you can simply take a small leaf out of the rosette!

This leaves can be eaten, juiced, crushed for facials and smelled to stop a nose bleed!  The juice can be rubbed on scraps, burns and bites. There are many more used too!  Read more

Begin your own little pot of these enjoyable plants and watch them multiply!

In an earlier Hens and Chicks  blog post I recommended that they be placed in the Helpful People area of the Bagua, however, these three on the window sill are placed in the Creative/Adventure portion of the Bagua.  The pots are metal and round and reflect the metal element for this particular position on the Bagua. Metal and the round shape reflect a zen like quality.  Little metal zen pots with wood, fire and earth aspects.  Wood is the plant itself. Earth is the soil and the red tips and shape of the leaves reflect the fire element! Read more

Create your own little zen pot of healing goodness!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

‘Hen’s n’ Chicks’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Edible Mortar

by Renee Lindstrom

Being Creative with Hens n’ chicks – taken July ‘l7

by Renee Lindstrom

Hens n’ Chicks – taken 2016

Sempervivum tectorum

Family:   Crassulaceae

Common Names:  Houseleek, Stonecrop Houseleek, Wallpepper, Kidneywort and Water Houseleek, Thor’s Beard, Aaron’s Rod

Origin:  Native of Central & Southern Europe, Greek Islands and Africa

History:  A common site in Central and Southern Europe covering the roofs of local Cottages.  It was believed to ward off sorcery, storms, lightening and fire!  In Sweden it was used to preserve thatched roofs.

Art of Placement Tips:  

Fondly called Hens and Chicks in North America, due to their pattern of spreading.  Starting with one plant it sends out shoots quickly creating a circle of them.  For this reason the placement of this plant in Western Feng Shui gardening is in the Helpful People corner of the Baqua!  The circular pattern reflects the element of metal which also supports this area of the Baqua.

Two Hen’s and Chicks circle arrangement are used for protection and luck at one’s front door! The herbaceous leaves symbolizes water in Feng Shui which translates to luck and wealth.

Folklore suggested that having this plant at the door would increase the sexual prowess of husbands returning home from the fields at the end of the day!  Hens and Chicks Pic courtesy Renee Lindstrom

Growing Conditions:

Hens and Chicks are hardy and easy to grow.  They usually have one large root topped with a rosette of leaves that are robust and fleshy.  The leaves are filled with water enabling the plant to withstand drought like conditions.

These plants enjoy full sun and well draining soil conditions.  They are great for rock walls and fences! They can be grown indoors.

When the plant reaches 3 to 5 years it will grow a tall central stem of unique flowers.  As the flower dies so will the original plant, which will have re-seeded itself.

Edible:

The leaves of the Sempervivum tectorum are edible and commonly used as an Aloe Vera replacement.  Crunchy like a cucumber and similar in taste.  It can be juiced, added to smoothies and made into a tea.

Beneficial Uses of the Leaves

  • Skin Re-freshener & Lightener

I have put the leaves in the blender to chop them and then placed the chunky juice on my face as a re-freshener and to lighten age spots!

  • Medicinal   

I have used the leaves for nosebleeds by breaking it and holding it to my nostril to smell.  The nosebleed will usually stop immediately.  if not, it reduces the blood flow where I usually put a small piece of leave in my nostril until it comes to a complete stop.

The leaves are fleshy like Aloe Vera and have a saline, astringent and acid taste.  In large doses the juice is emetic and purgative.

The juice is used in the  treatment of ulcers, inflammation, burns and scalds, skin conditions, earache, corns and wart.  It improves sleep, immunity, headaches, asthma, gout, heart disease, the circulatory system and increases blood pressure.  It can be used for  common flu conditions.

Freshly crushed leaves or pure juice can be put on wounds, ulcers, sores, blisters and sun spots. Freshly picked leaves prepared as tea can be used for Herpes Zoster, malignant skin conditions, inflammation of the gums and throat, chapped skin, hemorrhoids and worms.

 

Culpepper informs us that:

‘Our ordinary Houseleek is good for all inward heats, as well as outward, and in the eyes or other parts of the body: a posset made of the juice is singularly good in all hot agues, for it cooleth and tempereth the blood and spirits and quencheth the thirst; and is also good to stay all defluction or sharp and salt rheums in the eyes, the juice being dropped into them. If the juice be dropped into the ears, it easeth pain…. It cooleth and restraineth all hot inflammations St. Anthony’s fire (Erysipelas), scaldings and burnings, the shingles, fretting ulcers, ringworms and the like; and much easeth the pain and the gout.’
After describing the use of the leaves in the cure of corns, he goes on to say:
‘it easeth also the headache, and the distempered heat of the brain in frenzies, or through want of sleep, being applied to the temples and forehead. The leaves bruised and laid upon the crown or seam of the head, stayeth bleeding at the nose very quickly. The distilled water of the herb is profitable for all the purposes aforesaid. The leaves being gently rubbed on any place stung with nettles or bees, doth quickly take away the pain.’

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Hosta

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Mortar Edible

Symbolizes balance of the elements:  Earth, Wood, Water, Fire & Air

Nurtures:  Bees, Butterfly’s, Hummingbirds and Humans (Visual pleasure and calming influence)

Represents:  Integrity, Balance & Potential


Perfect garden plant for mirroring the cycle of connection in relationships!

Roots + Growth = Blossoms

Values + Sensations = Observation & Listening

  • Non-moralistic judgement and being present:  The flowers of the Hosta reflect Observation and Listening
  • Sensations/Feelings:  The leaves of the Hosta reflect Heart-felt sensual awareness
  • Values:  The roots reflect a Culture of Values



Ultimately one could say the blossoms of the hosta =’s a plants version of man’s connection to higher self and expanded consciousness

  •  Violet Blossoms – Personal Identification with the infinite:  Oneness, Peace
  • Green Leaves – Expressing love in actions
  • Yellow edges on Leaves – Experience, Personal Power & Goals

Representation in three of the 9 life areas:

  • Financial –  Economic success through balance of heart-love, values  & wisdom    (attitude:  highest benefit  for all)
  • Fame – Integrity and balance in leadership
  • Relationship – Heart – Mind balanced wisdom in connections

Companion Mineral

Amethyst

Amethyst

  • Stimulate and soothes the mind and emotions
  • Associated with water

Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


 Copyright 2017 – Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000