Hairy Bittercress (Cardamine hirsuta)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

MortarEdible

2017-03-27 11.20.08

 

Also Knows as:  Lambs CressLand Cress, Flick Weed, Shot Weed, Pepper Weed, Snap Weed & Spring Cress

Uses:  Culinary, Old Medicinal Remedy

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves & Roots

Preparation:  Flower Essence, Infused Oil, Infused Vinegar

Recipes

 


  • Symbolizes:   Bright mind (clarity & perception), right action, connected to heart

Culinary

The Hairy Bittercress weed is part of the member of the mustard family (Brassicaceae).  Other members of the mustard family include kale, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, turnip, horseradish, wasabi  and Sweet Alyssum.  Eating it raw and fresh gives you the best nutrients and it tastes great in salads and sandwiches and with eggs.  It is milder than horseradish and like garden cress it is peppery.

Health and Wellness

I have read that in the past Hairy Bittercress was used as a heart sedative, diuretic and expectorant.  In Greek Cardamine translates to heart subdued.  This plant grows in cool weather and is hearty.  It is a known for being full of Vitamin C and sulphur which increases oxygen to the cells making this a great fresh wild winter green.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

The Amazing Dandelion

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Mortartea kettleEdibleDyedeer

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Dandelion

by Renee Lidnstrom

Spring Dandelions

Uses:  Culinary, Pot Herb, Medicinal, Dye, Detox, Coffee Substitute, Love Potion, Weight Control, Anti Aging, Tonic

Parts used:  Flowers, Leaves, Roots

Preparation:  Fresh, Culinary, Dried,  Flower Essences,  Infused Water, Juicing, Oil, Tea, Tincture, Vinegar

Recipes


  • Symbolizes:   Circle of Life, Hope, Dreams, Well-being and Joy
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Joy and Faithfulness
  • Associated with: Binding Love, Crown  and Solar Plexus Chakra’s
  • Element:  Air
  • Governed by:  Jupiter

Health & Wellness

Dandelions are increasing in popularity in mainstream health and fitness programs to the point of being called a super food due to the volume of goodness in each plant.  I recently discovered that the flowers are a mild pain reliever when they are infused with oil and used on joints, aches and pain.  As a Feldenkrais®Practitionerthis is good news for  many students and clients.  They would be relieved to learn more natural ways of controlling their pain.

Dandelions are a very rich source of beta-carotene and when consumed we convert this into Vitamin A. Their active ingredients are found in both the roots and leaves.  Dandelions are a good source of:

  • Vitamins: A,C, K and B-vitamins
  • Minerals: magnesium, zinc, potassium, iron, calcium and choline

Their chemical breakdown:

  • Sesquiterpene lactones (bitters): taraxinic acid (taraxacin), tetrahydroridentin B
    • Triterpenoids and sterols: taraxasterol, taraxerol, cycloartenol, beta-sitosterol
    • Other: Vitamin A, Vitamin C, tannins, alkaloids, pectin, inulin, starch, potassium, beta carotene, caffeic acid, flavonoids (apigenin)

Interesting to Know that Dandelion leaves are high in vitamin A, vitamin C and have more iron, calcium and protein than spinach!

Conditions Dandelions Have been used for and currently being researched  for:

  • Antioxidant
  • Digestive Aid
  • Inflammation
  • Immune System
  • Liver Detox and Cleanse
  • Gallbladder
  • Laxative
  • Cancer
  • Diabetes
  • Urinary disorders
  • Acne
  • Jaundice
  • Cancer
  • Anemia

How to use Dandelions

Each part of the plant is edible and can be used for creating medicinal remedies and  making tea. The flowers are used for fresh tea and the roots and leaves are mostly used as a dried herb for tea.  I have begun to dry the flower petals to use in tea. Fresh leaves and a few flower petals can be tossed into salads.

Did you know that,  you can cook the spring roots, leaves, flowers and buds or add the to a smoothie, make wine or use as a coffee substitute?

Buy Dried Dandelion Roots

Buy Dried Dandelion Leaves

Try stir frying fresh spring leaves with oil and garlic and toss the unfurled flower buds in.  As you eat the buds they pop in your mouth!  I notice that the bitterness is reduced with cooking.  In spring,  the roots also are soft and tender and can be added together with leaves into a stir fry or stewed dishes and soups.  Add flower petals to a grain dish to add colour and flavour.

Next time you weed your garden set them aside to try them in your own recipes.

Buy Canadian Dandelion Seeds


Read more:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Celebrating milestone with nature’s beauty

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

This is the time of year to have a birthday!  Imagine the edible bounty that is on display almost moment by moment as it emerges!  To celebrate with a good friend the morning began with foraging out in the yard.

Garnish

The edible garnish you see are pansy, cherry blossoms  forget me nots on the celebratory dessert.   On the plate the edible garnish you see fresh native current (of the Pacific Northwest), wild English daisy, dandelion, rosemary, butterbur, polyanthus, forsythia and oxalis flowers, wild garlic chives, and columbine leaves. The hard boiled egg was dyed with scotch broom flowers the evening before.  

Salad

The salad the ingredients was what was available that morning.  We had overwintered veggies; red lettuce, small kale and Swiss chard leaves, hairy bitter cress, purple dead nettle, dandelion, malva, yellow dock and herb Robert leaves (weeds),  rosemary, mint and oregano leaves, angelica and fennel, chives and the leaves from the flowers; creeping jennyoxalis, barren strawberries, butterbur, hollyhock, forget me nots.  

Soup

Began with a beef broth and miso.  The ingredients added came from the yard.  These included overwintered leeks, kale and Swiss chard together with a few herbs, rosemary and oregano.  Sprinkled on top – rosemary flowers.

Tea

Tea was a wonderful infusion of bay laurel leaves!

Keeping it simple, for me,  heightens the flavours of all the ingredients and there isn’t the heaviness of eating afterwards, only a sense of full filled that lasts through out the day! That means no snacking!!!!

I heard back that this was the best birthday lunch ever!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

#edibles in grocery parking lot

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com

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Edibles in local grocery parking lot

Here are some of the same edibles that I find growing in my own yard in a tossed salad.  In eating ingredients closer to the growing source, from ground to table, I am noticing a difference in my addictive cravings, levels of hunger, clear-thinking processes, increased alkaline feeling in mouth and stomach, cleaner teeth, faster  metabolism and more restful with increase in deep sleeping.

This inspires a question about the possibility of feeding many.  If our Greater Victoria Communities no longer spray public areas and have banned it in public grounds, why not? Are there programs that edible weeds and flowers are apart of  our #yyj food programs?   Is anyone showing low incomer’s the availability of this free food resource to cut down on their bills?

What I am learning in researching the health benefits of these different plants is that they are full of free vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, etc. What is most important is the fact that our bodies are designed to ingest this goodness from this source much easier than processed and pharma manufactured ones.  Why? I believe from ground to table is more in alignment with our ability to process the ingredients.

Are you inspired to forage?  If so, Dandelions, Purple Dead Nettle, Cleavers and Chickweed are excellent starter plants to add to your tossed salad greens.  They are easy to identify and you can eat both flowers and leaves.  You can also use them to make tea.  (Learn more about these plants.)


Embrace a more self-reliant lifestyle

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Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Docks- Super Cleanser & great for a new phase in life

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Docks: Broad Leaf & Curly

Dock Plants can have up to 80,000 seeds that have been found to be viable for 80 years

Broad Leaf  Dock

Broad Leaf Dock (Rumex obtusifolius) & Yellow Dock (Curly Dock)  (Rumex crispus)

Curly (Yellow Dock) is the dock variety used more in making remedies however, both are edible.  Dock leaves are used in salads and cooked like spinach.   

Yellow Dock is associated with the Sacral Chakra

Dock is a great herb for transition and transformation! Physically it supports cleansing that can reflect cutting ties to what binds one and stops them from moving on. Emotionally it can help release anxiety and pain from the past.  It supports clearing the boundaries between inner and outer space and supports moving into a new phase in life.

It has been used:

  • as a spring tonic
  • to help increase the intestines absorption of minerals
  • invigorate the colon
  • appetite enhancer
  • in remedies for:
    • herpes,
    • syphilis,
    • vaginitis,
    • ovarian cysts and fibroids,
    • tumors,
    • boils,
    • acne,
    • thrush,
    • ulcers,
    • dysentery,
    • hemorrhoids,
    • urinary tract infections,
    • kidney and gallstones,
    • acidosis,
    • worms
    • adjunctive support for diabetics
    • Crohn’s disease,
    • food allergies,
    • gout,
    • certain skin diseases,
    • congestive dysmennorhea,
    • jaundice
    • chronic constipation
    • regulate menstrual bleeding
  • in  Magic for:
    • new business ventures
    • drawing in business success &  financial abundance
    • drawing in personal love

Leaves

The leaves are known to be high in beta-carotene, vitamin C  and contain chlorophyll, vitamins A and  oxalic acid and the best time to pick them is when they are just unfurling.

Roots

Most commonly used portion of Dock for medicinal remedies.  The roots contain tannins, chrysophanic acid, rumicin and minerals.  The roots can be harvested in the fall with a stick  which is sometimes a better tool to get the long tap root.  Once taking off the outer layer of the root it is bright yellow and cutting into the root you will see that it has growth rings.

Dye

Yellow Dock got it’s name from these yellow roots that fade as they dry.  Fresh roots once were used to make yellow die.

Seeds

The seeds are a rich source of calcium, riboflavin and fiber while low in protein and fat and can help the body absorb Vitamin C.  They can be eaten raw or cooked once they are brown.  They turn brown late August into September. When you collect the seeds, remove all leaves and stems grind them or store them whole. You can grind the seeds in a blender, with a mortar and pestle or in a spice grinder. Once ground store in an air-tight jar. Whole seeds can be stored in a paper bag.

 

Magic & Folklore

Dock imparts courage, strength and opens one to  magical will.  It is considered a lucky plant and is used for new business ventures and  to increase success, finances and finding love.


Leaf Recipes

I pick the leaves on occasion to use medicinally to flavor a picture of the days drinking water, to infuse in olive oil for salves and creams and to infuse in alcohol for tinctures.  I add fresh leaves to salads, sauté in olive oil and garlic and add to; egg dishes, stir fries, sauce for pasta and bean dishes.

Be Aware:  The leaves contain oxalic acid as does other foods such as spinach.  In small quantities they can be eaten raw however eating large quantities means that the oxalic acid can lock-up other nutrients in the food, especially calcium, thus causing mineral deficiencies. The oxalic acid content will be greatly reduced if the plant is cooked. If you have any medical conditions, consult a health professional before you eat the leaves.


Root Recipes

Dock Tea – Blood Builder & Mild Laxative

  • quart of water
  • one cup of fresh or dried Yellow Dock Roots
  • Honey or Stevia as sweeten

Boil one quart of water, reduce the heat and add  one cup of fresh or dried yellow Dock Root and cover.  Simmer for 12 minutes, uncover and simmer for another 90 minutes.    Add honey or stevia as a sweetener and drink up to four cups a day.

*When liquid is cooled, may be used as a wash for skin conditions.

Dock Vinegar Infusion – Blood Builder & Digestive Aid

  • Apple Cider Vinegar
  • Fresh or Dried yellow Dock Roots

The amount will depend upon the size of  jar you use.  Once you have filled the jar 2/4 full with Yellow Dock Root cover with vinegar and add a slight bit more.

  1. Cover Roots with (apple cider) vinegar  and close container.
  2. Let sit for for six weeks shaking  daily.
  3. Strain after six weeks and pour into clean container.

Use 1 to 2 tablespoons a day (use at meals with oil for salad dressing!)

Dock Syrup

  • 1/2 pound of Yellow Dock Root
  • Pint of Water
  • 1/2 cup Dark Honey
  • 1/2 Cup Blackstrap Molasses
  • 1 Tsp Pure Maple Syrup

Boil half pound of dock root in a pint of water. Leave it until the liquid that remains is only a cupful. Filter the liquid and add half a cup dark honey, half a cup blackstrap molasses and one teaspoon of pure maple syrup.  Add a pinch of vanilla to it for essence.

Blend everything by hand till you produce a smooth thick sweet sticky liquid or syrup.

  • Take one teaspoon at a time to heal bronchitis, asthma as well as cease tickling or scratching commotion in the throat or the lungs,
  • Take one tablespoon a day to increase iron in the blood!

Seed Recipes

Flour

  • Grind dock seeds find and use as flour

 

Coffee Substitute

  • Grind dock seeds and use as coffee substitute

 

Crackers

  • Ingredients
    • 1 cup ground (flour) dock seed
    • 1 cup flour of your choice
    • 1 tsp. sea salt
    • Water
  • Instructions
    • Mix brown crushed dock seed, flour and salt.  Add water slowly until the dough is pliable (not sticky). On a well-floured surface roll dough thinly. Cut into shapes. Then transfer them onto a well-greased baking sheet.
  • Bake 10-12 minutes at 375°F or until crisp.

Folk Lore & Magic Recipes

Dock Tea for Drawing in Wealth & New Business

Make a tea from Dock and wash door knobs, telephones and cash registers in your business to draw in  wealth and new business.

Dock Tea for Drawing in Love

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Make a tea from Dock and splash on your hands and face prior to seeing your love interest.


Read more on Sprouting Dock Seeds


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Recipe Ideas for eating Common Plantain

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Picture by Renee Lindstrom

Broadleaf Plantain

Culpepper writes “Plantains are singularly good wound herbs, to heal fresh or old wounds or sores, either inward or outward.”

 

Recipes Ideas

Leaves

  • Salads

Use leaves as a salad green when young and tender.   They contain calcium, minerals and vitamin A.

  • Steamed/Boiled

Leaves can be used as an alternative to spinach and kale.  Has a subtle flavour so seasoning with herbs, garlic, lemon and soya sauce work well.

  • Boil 3 minutes for young leaves, 5 minutes for old ones, and 4 minutes for a mixed batch
  • Use as a side dish or in omelettes and pasta.
  • Smoothie
  • Add one cup of leaves to your green smoothies.
  • Baked Chips from the leaves of Common Plantain

24 large leaves 

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon seasoning: try garlic powder, nutritional yeast, half the quantity of cayenne

Preheat the oven to 250F.

  • Wash the plantain leaves and pat or air dry them well 
  • Toss the leaves with the oil until well coated. Spread in a single later on baking sheets. 
  • Sprinkle with the salt and seasoning.
  • Bake until crisp but not burnt, 10 to 20 minutes depending on the size of the leaves. They will continue to crisp up a bit as they cool.

Store your Plantago chips in an airtight container for several weeks. If chips absorb some humidity and lose their crispness put them back into a 250F oven for 3 – 5 minutes.

Seeds

  • Ideas for Eating Common Plantain Seeds

FYI – Plantago ovata is the source of Psyllium husks, therefore the seed of the Common Plantain would also be a good fiber source.

Consider using Plantain Seeds as an alternative to Flax Seeds!

 

I picked some when they were still green to infuse and found that there wasn’t much oil even after steeping.  Tasted the seed before and after, and while not unpleasant , they didn’t have the flavour that is developing as they age and change colour.

  • Seed Shoots

When  the shoots are green and tender and no longer than about four inches they have a  nutty, asparagus-like taste when pan fried in olive oil.

  • Pan-fry in olive oil for just a few seconds to bring out this taste.

 

  • Seeds

Seeds are harvested when they have turned brown or black.

  • Add them to crackers, breads, muffins, etc.
  • Infuse them with hot water and steep to draw out oil.
  • Boiled as hot cereal.
  • Roasted (nutty flavor).
  • Pounded into powder as soup or stew thickener.

Buy Canadian  Plantain Seeds


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Black Medic (Medicago lupulin)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

EdibleMortarcollage-1465420825401 (1)

Also known as:  Hop Clover, Yellow Trefoil or Burclover

  • Uses:  edible, medicinal, natural fertilizer
  • Parts used: leaves, roots & seeds
  • Preparation: fresh as pot herb, dry the seeds

Health & Wellness

Black Medic was introduced from Europe.  It is an edible and a medicinal weed often mistaken for clover.

It is green manure grown before the first crop is planted to add nitrogen to the soil.  It is a beneficial plant in the garden as it fertilizes nearby plants with nitrogen.

Rich in vitamins A, C, and E, young leaves and shoots can be eaten raw or cooked as a potherb. They contain about 6% protein, 0.14% fat, 9.5% carbohydrate and 1.4% ash.

The seeds can be eaten raw, dried or roasted and ground into flour when they turn black..

Black Medic has laxative qualities and has antibacterial properties against micro-organisms.

Read More on Edible, Medicinal, Dye Plants


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2019  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000