Privet ( ligustrum lucidum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:

tea kettleDyeMortar

2017-08-30 14.40.02

Also known as:

Uses: Medicinal Remedies, Dye, Tea

Parts Used:  Berries, Flowers, Leaves, Bark

Preparation:  Tea, Vinegar, Oil, Tincture, Infusion, Flower Essence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Symbolizes:   Healing old wounds, letting go of blocks
  • Language of Flowers meaning:  Mildness, Prohibitive
  • Associated with:  Sacral Chakra
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by: Moon

Part of the olive family (Oleaceae)

I planted what I thought was a small shrub five years ago that was gifted to us. With no identifying information to go along with I was surprised after two years when it began stretching, spreading and growing taller.  It is now 10 feet high and getting wider.  According to different sources of information could grow from 15 to 30 feet high.  The is the evergreen that many topiary cuttings are created with and it is popular for use in Bonsai.  It flowered for the first time two years ago and this year there are many fruits developing as we enter into fall.  The flowers are a nice fragrance to begin with but slowly they become less attractive over the days as the blooms diminish.  This year this Privet is gifting us with an abundance of fruit that are forming from the spent flowers.  When the fruits are ripe in the fall, these are the main part of this plant used in Traditional Chinese and Herbal Remedies.  The leaves, flowers and bark can also used.  You will find the dried berries ground up in many medicinal and beauty products!

Nutrients & Qualities: 

Privet has applications as a  diuretic, astringent, antiseptic, immuno-stimulant, anti-cholestrolemic and it has anti-cancer properties.  It is known to invigorate the immune system.

  • Constituents:
    • quercetin glycosides;  flavonol glycosides, secoiridoids (oleuropein, ligustaloside A, ligustaloside B, and ligstroside)
    • kaempferol glycosides
    • polyphenols
    • oleanolic
    • palmitic
    • linoleic
    • ursolic acids
    • mannitol
    • glucose
    • starch
    • bitter resin
    • bitter extractive
    • albumen
    • salts
    • ligustrin

Therapeutic Uses:

  • Flowers:
    • Headaches
    • Vaginal Irritations
    • Menstrual Problems
  • Leaves:
    • Diarrhea
    • Bladder disorders
    • Stomach ulcers
    • Indigestion
    • Increase appetite
    • Sore throat & eyes
    • Ulcers
    • Swellings
    • Mumps
    • Chapped lips
    • Throat cancer
  • Leaves & bark: 
    • Headaches
    • Tumours
    • Bronchitis
    • Coughs
    • Light-headedness
    • Chronic bowel problems
    • Vaginal douche
    • Mouthwash or gargle
    • Wash for skin problems
  • Berries/Seeds:
    • Liver & Kidney ailments
    • Increase energy
    • Menopause
    • Insomnia
    • Premature aging
    • Grey hair
    • Heart palpitations
    • Rheumatoid arthritis
    • Tinnitus (a ringing in the ear)
    • Backache
    • Eye issues including cataracts, glaucoma & cataract
    • Contagious ailments: hepatitis B & sexually transmitted diseases (STD)
    • High blood pressure (hypertension)
    • Pneumocystis Carinii pneumonia (a fungal infection of the lungs)
    • Respiratory problems

How to use Leaves & Bark:

Boil 1 tsp. leaves or bark in 1 cup water. Take 1 to 2 cups a day.


Recommended Reading:

  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • Book Review:  Wonderful Book, everyone should have a copy
    • on June 24, 1997 – I have every single one of this authors books. The information in them is terrific, including this one. It covers the different types of herbal philosophies. Mainly the Chinese and Ayurvedic systems. He integrates them both with western herbs, and makes it work. I won’t say his book has everything and every herb but it has a lot, and some of the more unusual herbs you usually can’t find in the regular every day herb books. It’s wonderful, and worth every penny you pay for it

Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

 

Celebrating milestone with nature’s beauty

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

This is the time of year to have a birthday!  Imagine the edible bounty that is on display almost moment by moment as it emerges!  To celebrate with a good friend the morning began with foraging out in the yard.

Garnish

The edible garnish you see are pansy, cherry blossoms  forget me nots on the celebratory dessert.   On the plate the edible garnish you see fresh native current (of the Pacific Northwest), wild English daisy, dandelion, rosemary, butterbur, polyanthus, forsythia and oxalis flowers, wild garlic chives, and columbine leaves. The hard boiled egg was dyed with scotch broom flowers the evening before.  

Salad

The salad the ingredients was what was available that morning.  We had overwintered veggies; red lettuce, small kale and Swiss chard leaves, hairy bitter cress, purple dead nettle, dandelion, malva, yellow dock and herb Robert leaves (weeds),  rosemary, mint and oregano leaves, angelica and fennel, chives and the leaves from the flowers; creeping jennyoxalis, barren strawberries, butterbur, hollyhock, forget me nots.  

Soup

Began with a beef broth and miso.  The ingredients added came from the yard.  These included overwintered leeks, kale and Swiss chard together with a few herbs, rosemary and oregano.  Sprinkled on top – rosemary flowers.

Tea

Tea was a wonderful infusion of bay laurel leaves!

Keeping it simple, for me,  heightens the flavours of all the ingredients and there isn’t the heaviness of eating afterwards, only a sense of full filled that lasts through out the day! That means no snacking!!!!

I heard back that this was the best birthday lunch ever!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Can you make tea from your herb n’ flowers you use in your infused baths?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

2017-03-25 11.57.36

Herbs, Flowers ‘n Roots

As part of the infusing  process for a soothing and healing bathing experience I have begun to make tea from the same herbs, flowers and roots as those I use.   I find the experience of drinking the tea as I draw a bath full-filling.  It is satisfying to be treating the outside as great as the inside! For a few moments in my week I am connecting to a fuller awareness of the inside-outside connections.

The herbs, flowers and roots used in this early spring tea and infusion were; feverfew, mullein, butterfly vine, calendula, peony and Nootka rose flowers, mullein, feverfew, celery leaves, spruce needles, and mullein root.  I choose these plants as they are beginning to come to life in our garden and indoors as they sprout from seed.


Become aware of the relationship to what foods & medicinal’s you invite into your experience, inside and outside, for radiant health.  Developing one’s connection to the plants, herbs and trees through gardening, eating and harvesting them increases the body’s alignment to their qualities, whether eating or making healing products (tinctures, oils, teas, and poultice’s) with them.  If you plant seeds, do what the aboriginal gardeners and seed collectors  of Southern Countries still do today, soak the seeds in your mouth a moment before planting!  Now that is an intentional connection!!!!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

‘Uncovering the healing powers in your own garden’

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Have you taken time to explore what plants you have in your garden that you can use to make your own healing teas, use to add a shine to your hair or revive your skin!

Bay Leaf Laurel

Bay Leaf Laurel

Some of my favorites can be used to add spice to recipes, make a soothing tea and to use as a skin and hair tonic.  These include; rosemary, bay leaf, fennel, hens and chicks and bamboo!  Salads  are a treat with; dandelion, yellow dock and hosta leaves or pansy, nasturtium or gladioli flowers!  I keep hens and chicks close by for burns, nose bleeds and bug bites!

Over time I have become a dedicated forger and gardener.  It has been a slow integration that transitioned into a relationship after spending time to explore the benefits of what was growing in my yard.    Getting to know these plants more intimately has brought a whole new experience to my lifestyle!

Since the spring of 2016 I have begun to make home-made hand and body soap using oils made from my landscape.  I make my own flavored vinegar and waters, and teas  from fresh or dried plant materials from my yard.   This past season I used cough syrup that I made from plants I foraged along the Pacific Ocean and used medicinal tinctures infused from fresh plant materials foraged and picked from your garden.

It has been a journey that I hadn’t planned.  It started with a curiosity and will to explore.  Do I recommend that others begin to forage in their own communities and explore the medicinal qualities of their own garden plants?  Yes I do.  I believe that this activity will create healthier, happier people who will care about their environment.  For me, I describe it as an inner activist movement.

I also encourage others to explore what plants can be recycled!  Your veggies such as celery, onions, beets, cabbage and potatoes can be regrown from the ends that you throw away!  Next time you go to compost or throw them out, pause and explore how you can re-growth them!

I urge you to begin planning your garden so that you can create your own living outdoor medicine cabinet.

Here is a list of some of the garden plants I have explored in my garden – Berries, Edible Flowers, Garden Plants, Trees, Veggies & Weeds for your Healing Garden


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.