What’s in the box today?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

‘2017’s’ second batch of infusions!

Health, Wellness & Beauty


 

 

Oils

Tinctures

  • Self Heal Flowers, Leaves & Roots
  • Lavender Flowers
  • Hollyhock Flowers
  • Bamboo
  • Mullein

Vinegar

  • Lavender

There isn’t anything to compare using your own products that you have spent time developing a relationship with too.  Whether you grow you own plant materials, trade with your neighbour, forage or purchase dried plant materials the time with the infusion is invaluable for viewing the beauty unfolding and developing appreciation.

Imagine taking a medicinal, or supplementing your wellness regimen, massaging with your own oils, cooking and creating your own beauty items; soaps, creams, salves, shampoo’s, with  products that you have developed a close connection with!  Your wonder and appreciation will be the gift of added energy to the recipes you create.  Let the healing begin!


Make your own:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Hollyhock (Alcea rosea)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP:  This post may contain Affiliate Links, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

  

 

Species: Malvaceae (Mallow) Family

Language of Flowers Meaning:  Ambition

The beautiful flowers of the Hollyhock can be used to make cold infusions,  tea and substituted for Wild Marsh Mallow.  The fibrous stalks can be used in paper making, the roots in medicinal’s and the leaves and flowers for eating in your summer salads or in an infusion for hair and skin!

A completely easy to grow flower that offers more than height and beauty! A perennial that grows well in hard soils and is drought resistant!

Flowers

The beautiful flowers can be eaten fresh or dried for later use. They make a wonderful water infusion for bathing, drinking and soap making.  They are demulcent, diuretic and emollient.

When making a medicinal infusion it is best to use cold water and not hot.  Heat will cut the effectiveness of the infusion. Rest unblemished flowers in cool water overnight (approx. 8 hours), strain and enjoy.  This infusion is great for soothing your gastrointestinal, respiratory and urinary tracts, it induces urination, soothes ulcers and relieves a sore throat and dry cough. It can be used as an emollient for skin and hair.

Leaves

The leaves can also be eaten fresh, raw or steamed.  However this is a plant you may wish to eat leaves from when first emerging due to the fibrous material, or try chopping small into salads.  The leaves can also be heated to use as a poultice for splinters, inflammation or chapped skin.

Roots 

The roots are astringent and demulcent and contain a beneficial starch.  When crushed the roots can be applied as a poultice to ulcers. Taken internally, it can be used for dysentery.

Seeds

The seeds are used as a demulcent, diuretic and febrifuge.

Buy Canadian Hollyhock Seeds


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


 

Celebrating milestone with nature’s beauty

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

This is the time of year to have a birthday!  Imagine the edible bounty that is on display almost moment by moment as it emerges!  To celebrate with a good friend the morning began with foraging out in the yard.

Garnish

The edible garnish you see are pansy, cherry blossoms  forget me nots on the celebratory dessert.   On the plate the edible garnish you see fresh native current (of the Pacific Northwest), wild English daisy, dandelion, rosemary, butterbur, polyanthus, forsythia and oxalis flowers, wild garlic chives, and columbine leaves. The hard boiled egg was dyed with scotch broom flowers the evening before.  

Salad

The salad the ingredients was what was available that morning.  We had overwintered veggies; red lettuce, small kale and Swiss chard leaves, hairy bitter cress, purple dead nettle, dandelion, malva, yellow dock and herb Robert leaves (weeds),  rosemary, mint and oregano leaves, angelica and fennel, chives and the leaves from the flowers; creeping jennyoxalis, barren strawberries, butterbur, hollyhock, forget me nots.  

Soup

Began with a beef broth and miso.  The ingredients added came from the yard.  These included overwintered leeks, kale and Swiss chard together with a few herbs, rosemary and oregano.  Sprinkled on top – rosemary flowers.

Tea

Tea was a wonderful infusion of bay laurel leaves!

Keeping it simple, for me,  heightens the flavours of all the ingredients and there isn’t the heaviness of eating afterwards, only a sense of full filled that lasts through out the day! That means no snacking!!!!

I heard back that this was the best birthday lunch ever!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Back Yard Salad in March!

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

Foraging for the day’s yard salad ingredients we found these to add to the garden parsley, swiss chard and kale that is emerging.   Bowls were overflowing and it’s only the end of March!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.