Celebrating milestone with nature’s beauty

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

This is the time of year to have a birthday!  Imagine the edible bounty that is on display almost moment by moment as it emerges!  To celebrate with a good friend the morning began with foraging out in the yard.

Garnish

The edible garnish you see are pansy, cherry blossoms  forget me nots on the celebratory dessert.   On the plate the edible garnish you see fresh native current (of the Pacific Northwest), wild English daisy, dandelion, rosemary, butterbur, polyanthus, forsythia and oxalis flowers, wild garlic chives, and columbine leaves. The hard boiled egg was dyed with scotch broom flowers the evening before.  

Salad

The salad the ingredients was what was available that morning.  We had overwintered veggies; red lettuce, small kale and Swiss chard leaves, hairy bitter cress, purple dead nettle, dandelion, malva, yellow dock and herb Robert leaves (weeds),  rosemary, mint and oregano leaves, angelica and fennel, chives and the leaves from the flowers; creeping jennyoxalis, barren strawberries, butterbur, hollyhock, forget me nots.  

Soup

Began with a beef broth and miso.  The ingredients added came from the yard.  These included overwintered leeks, kale and Swiss chard together with a few herbs, rosemary and oregano.  Sprinkled on top – rosemary flowers.

Tea

Tea was a wonderful infusion of bay laurel leaves!

Keeping it simple, for me,  heightens the flavours of all the ingredients and there isn’t the heaviness of eating afterwards, only a sense of full filled that lasts through out the day! That means no snacking!!!!

I heard back that this was the best birthday lunch ever!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Can you make tea from your herb n’ flowers you use in your infused baths?

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

2017-03-25 11.57.36

Herbs, Flowers ‘n Roots

As part of the infusing  process for a soothing and healing bathing experience I have begun to make tea from the same herbs, flowers and roots as those I use.   I find the experience of drinking the tea as I draw a bath full-filling.  It is satisfying to be treating the outside as great as the inside! For a few moments in my week I am connecting to a fuller awareness of the inside-outside connections.

The herbs, flowers and roots used in this early spring tea and infusion were; feverfew, mullein, butterfly vine, calendula, peony and Nootka rose flowers, mullein, feverfew, celery leaves, spruce needles, and mullein root.  I choose these plants as they are beginning to come to life in our garden and indoors as they sprout from seed.


Become aware of the relationship to what foods & medicinal’s you invite into your experience, inside and outside, for radiant health.  Developing one’s connection to the plants, herbs and trees through gardening, eating and harvesting them increases the body’s alignment to their qualities, whether eating or making healing products (tinctures, oils, teas, and poultice’s) with them.  If you plant seeds, do what the aboriginal gardeners and seed collectors  of Southern Countries still do today, soak the seeds in your mouth a moment before planting!  Now that is an intentional connection!!!!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

March 18th & Already a Back Yard Salad

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP

In Mid-March buds, leaves and flowers began emerging on the plants in our community. On March 17th some back yard weeds and flowers were added to the salad and by March 18th it was a “back yard salad!”    During the fall and winter you forget the taste of all the fresh differences in using many leaves, herbs and flowers.  There was only one dandelion flower to pick among many weeks bursting through.

On March 19th there was a realization that a forager could begin eating fresh backyard veggies, weeds and flowers for the next few seasons!  As the season age the contents of the backyard salad would change as flowers, weeds and veggies come and go! In the picture above on the 20th ingredients where picked between clients to sit in water until later break! You can see more was added overnight.

Along with the 30 day Turmeric and Black Pepper Challenge,  another one has been made.  The challenge is to continue into Spring and Summer eating only back yard and foraged veggies, leaves, weeds, roots and flowers!   Today will be Day 2!

Read growing list of what’s growing in the backyard!


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Nature can teach us tolerance and acceptance:

Natures landscape, flora and fauna can model balance, being out of balance, assertiveness and receptivity.  As you study the nature of these features you can integrate this understanding in to your  relationships.  It will increase your skill of  holding more views other and just your own and expand your levels of tolerance.    For example:

  • Imagine the symbol that has come to represent the flow of energy as mirrored in Nature.

 

Yin - Yand

Yin – Yang

  •  Now here are some pictures of  Willows Beach to show Yin and Yang energies in Natures Landscape:

 

If you walked along the beach during this storm,  would you be afraid of intense confrontation of the wind?  I would imagine that you would meet the wind and rain with a resilience to stop from being blown off course.  The second picture would be a completely different experience.  It would be one of peace and a calming influence.

Take these two pictures and think about a time that you felt these two different types of experiences with a friend, boss, co-worker, child, parent or lover.  Did you stay free from the fear of conflict and walk through the intense energy with resilience and without taking it on?  The resilience you experienced in the storm can be experienced at these times when you discover it is about them, not you.  Nature teaches you an inner language that will increase your perceptive nature

My point in sharing this example is that it may be easier to be in our human relationships if we explore and learn from nature. Working with an Asian Teen I learned that they verbally compared me to the inside of a peeled banana. This reference was to my color of skin.  Another way of identifying their experience of people was putting them  in two categories; round and square.  How would you describe a round and square personality type?

Nature has been interpreted by many cultures and has modeled patterns that continue to define our evolution of intellect.  Science, math and geometry are a few examples. Now a need has become obvious for reacquainting our culture with nature in a personal and interesting way.  Remembering the relevance of nature as a mentor may resolve many universal unmet needs.

Enjoy reviewing  the shapes of the five elements in nature, learning to view plants, minerals and fauna as a way to connect to inner feelings and have fun with sharing their language in your connections with others.  One way would be in your messages to others through gifts!

 


 by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Green Behavior Programs grounded in ‘Nature as Nurturer’