Pacific Northwest Red Currant (Ribes sanguineum)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

Edible

by Renee Lindstrom

Pacific Northwest Red Current

Also known as:  Flowering Currant. Pink Winter Currant

Uses:  Culinary

Parts Used:  Berries, Flowers

Preparation: Fresh, Stewed, Dried, Syrup,  Jelly, Tea, Flower Essence

Taste:  Sweet with astringent aftertaste


 

 

 

 

  • Associated with:  Root Chakra

Culinary

This bush is considered an ornamental in our local communities.  There isn’t much foraging information about the Pacific Northwest Red Current.  The berry has a strong aftertaste and is extremely astringent.  It is an edible and medicinal that was once used until other useful plants began to sprout and become available.   It was dried, made into fruit leather, jelly and syrup and stewed, and eaten fresh.  It was usually added to other foods.

 

Back to #yyj Non-Native Winter Flowering Edible & Medicinal Shrubs


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2020  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

#yyj Winter Native Edible & Medicinal Plants

Two common native winter medicinal and edible plants that are about to burst into bloom!    Keep in mind when foraging them in the wild only take 1/3 of  flowers, leaves and roots.  Leave the rest for plant to continue growing in good health.  If harvesting backyard Oregon Grape remember only do so if not sprayed with chemicals!

Native Pacific Northwest Bleeding Hearts (Dicentra formosa)

Bleeding Heart

Flowers (not edible/medicinal only):  late March, hardy in shade 

Leaves (not edible/medicinal only) end of February

Leaves & Root:  Medicinal; Tincture, Flower Essence

Taste:  not edible

More on Bleeding Hearts

Photo credit: Ronald (Ron) Douglas Frazieron Visualhunt / CC BY


Oregon Grape

Oregon Grape

Flowers:  March

Flowers, Leaves & Roots:  Culinary, Medicinal,  Cosmetic, Flower Essence, Tincture, Infused Vinegar, Infused Oil

Taste:  Bitter, Sour

More on Oregon Grape

 

 


Pacific Northwest Red Current

by Renee Lindstrom

Pacific North-West Native Red Current

 

 

Flowers:  February

Flowers: Culinary, Flower Essence

Taste:  Sour

 

 


More on #yyj Winter:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000