Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP–Living in Natures Love Lifestyles insideawareness.com)

tea kettleEdibleMortarDyedeer

Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis) Photo by Renee Lindstrom

Also known as:  Evening Star,  Butter Rose, Cowslip, Fever Plant & King’s Cure-all, Sun Cup

Uses: Culinary, Medicinal, Tea

Parts used: Flowers, Leaves, Stems, Roots

Preparation:  Cosmetics, Essential Oil, Flower Essence, Infused Honey & Oils, Recipes, Tinctures

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  • Symbolizes:   Life of Fulfillment
  • Language of Flowers: Fickleness, faithlessness, sweet memories
  • Associated with: Protection, Love & Luck
  • Chakras:  Root, Sacral & Heart
  • Element:  Water
  • Governed by:  Moon
This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Culinary

All parts of the evening Primrose can be integrated into ones diet.  The roots can be eaten raw or cooked as a vegetable.  They grow large and are similar in appearance to parsnips and can be cooked like potatoes, carrots or parsnips.  One can add them fresh or dried to soups and , stews.  The leaves can be added to salad or steamed if tough and flowers can be added to salads and used as garnish or decoration on cakes, custards and puddings.

The seed pods can be roasted or when dried the seeds inside can be ground and added to smoothies, shakes, cereals, breads, muffins, etc.

Health & Wellness

“A study by the Highland Psychiatric Research Group at the Draig Dunain Hospital, Inverness, Scotland, found that evening primrose encouraged regeneration of liver cells damaged by alcohol consumption. Other researchers think it may also prevent alcoholic poisoning, hangovers, postdrink depression and alcohol withdrawal. It is thought to stop alcohol from damaging brain cells by bolstering them with unsaturated fats”  Herbalpedia

  • Evening Primrose has:
    • protein
    • carbohydrates
    • beta carotene
    • calcium
    • potassium
    • vitamin B3
    • Omega-6
    • amino acid tryptophan
    • bioflavonoid quercetin
  • Herbal Actions:
    • Gentle Sedative & Mood Enhancer – relaxing, grounding and uplifting
    • Anti-spasmodic – PMS cramping
    • Endocrine System  – relaxing
    • First Aid – bruised cuts, scratches, bug bites & stings
    • Digestion – stimulant, cooling & healing inflammation
    • Eczema & Rosacea – used topically
    • Hair Growth – used topically
  • Nutrition (per 1/2 cup):
    • Protein: 2.4 g
    • Carbs 7.3 g
    • Calcium 140 mg
    • Potassium 410 mg
    • Beta Carotene 4000 ug
    • Niacin 700  ug
  • Early North American uses:
    • Ojibwa – poultice for bruises
    • Cherokee – root tea to lose weight
    • Shakers – poultice for wounds & leave or root tea for upset stomach
  • Folklore:
    • increase desirably to potential lovers & friends – infuse into bath for encouraging inner beauty to shine through
    • Magical use in spells for increasing success in achieving ones goals

 

Growing Evening Primrose

The flower of the Evening Primrose may open before dusk, however the scent of the flower is not released until evening.  It is Native to Canada and the United States.  It is a self seeder so it can be found growing in full sun along rocky roads, in meadows, on dunes and beaches.  It has been naturalized in parts of Europe by Early Settlers transporting seeds back as early as 1614.  I have started mine by seed in the Spring as starters and transplanted them.  They seem to be hardy and though they enjoy full sun, these pictured above are growing in partial shade and are 1 year bloomers (unusual).  I would consider now starting them later in summer or early fall to have them come up as second year plants in spring.

Buy Canadian Evening Primrose Seeds

More Edible Garden Plants 

 

Recommended:


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.

Chickweed Medicine

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

 

Chickweed can be used internally as a demulcent and externally as an emollient.  It typically is made into tinctures, oils, ointments and salves yet it can also be mashed or infused with water for hot and inflamed skin conditions.    Chickweed contains astringent properties that is wonderful for hot and inflamed conditions.  It is also made into tea for herbal remedies.  Why not a flower essence?

Chickweed Infusion for Skin, Bites, Rashes, Itchiness, Painful Joints & Bruising

Add 1 cup freshly chopped (1/3 cup dried) chickweed to 4 cups boiling water and let it sit for up to 20 minutes before adding it to your bath water or cool to apply to skin to sooth bug bits, chicken-pox, rashes, bruises and joint pain.

Chickweed Tea as a Laxative

Steep 1 tablespoon fresh chopped (1 teaspoon) chickweed in one cup of hot water and steep into herbal tea for constipation or ease digestion.  Drink 3 to 4 times a day until condition improves.

Chickweed Poultice

Mash fresh chickweed to add to skin conditions such as bruising, bug bits, rashes, boils, chick-pox, wounds and slivers.  As the chickweed mash dries it will pull out slivers, poisons and toxins.

 

More on Chickweed (Stellaria media)

Chickweed Pesto Recipe

Buy Dried Canadian Chickweed


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only.  This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.  Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.


Copyright 2014 – 2018  Living in Nature’s Love by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP,
Feldenkrais® Practitioner since 2007, Communication & Empathy Coach since 2004, Art of Placement  since 2000

Garden plants that can be dried for teas, cosmetics & herbal remedies

by Renee Lindstrom, GCFP – Living in Natures Love Lifestyles @insideawareness.com

by Renee Lindstrom

Medicinal & Beauty Cabinet of Backyard Forager

Above is a picture of plants gathered from our yard and surrounding community (less than kilometer away) that have been dried and are being saved for tea, cosmetics and herbal remedies.   Below are lists of the seeds, leaves, stems and roots from our garden that have been dried.  Links to plant properties are included on some and are highlighted.  

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Seeds

Seeds are the fruit of the the plant and can be saved for future planting, used in cooking & baking and for sprouting.  Some seeds can be ground into flour, prepared as a coffee replacement or for tea

More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Flowers

Dried flowers can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies, infused honey, to add scent & colour to recipes,  to make natural dyes and used as potpourri

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Leaves

Dried leaves can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies and to make natural dyes

More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Dried Root

Dried roots can be used to make tea combinations, infusions for skin & hair, infusions for herbal remedies 

  • Comphrey
  • Dandelion
  • Mullein
  • Yellow Dock

 More on drying flowers, leaves and roots

3 easy steps for home style drying rack


Here are some of the ways I process my harvest

Once the plants are harvested it’s time for us to get creative.  Here are some of the ways that we enjoy integrating the garden harvest into our lives:

 

This post may contain Affiliate Links for your convenience, thank you in advance for your support!  Renee

Recommended Reading:

  • Backyard Medicine – Harvest and Make Your Own Herbal Remedies by Authors
    Julie-Bruton-Seal and Matthew Seal
  • Planetary Herbology by Michael Tierra C.A., N.D., O.M.D., Lotus Press, PO Box 325, Twin Lakes. WI 53181., Copyright 1988, published 1992
  • The Modern Herbal Dispensatory: A Medicine-Making Guide by North Atlantic Books, 2016, by Thomas Easley (Author), Steven Horne (Author)

    Book Comment:  5.0 out of 5 stars – This is a great book about making herbal medicine – By L. Meissneron on June 23, 2017
    Format: Paperback|Verified Purchase:  This is a great book about making herbal medicine. It goes into great detail with the different ways to make herbal medicine and specific ways to prepare certain plants. There are also tons of great herbal recipes to follow. Not just for beginners, but those who what to expand their knowledge of herbal preparations.


Traditional uses and properties of herbs are for educational purposes only. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Every attempt has been made for accuracy, but none is guaranteed. Any serious health concerns or if you are pregnant, you should always check with your health care practitioner before self-administering herbs.